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Stanford University

Stanford University

Private research university located in Stanford, California, United States.

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Its motto is "Die Luft der Freiheit weht", meaning "the air of freedom is blowing". Stanford is known for its academic strength, wealth, and proximity to Silicon Valley.



It was founded in 1885 by Leland and Jane Stanford in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Leland Stanford, a former Governor of California and U.S. Senator, made his fortune as a railroad tycoon. Stanford University struggled financially after Leland Stanford's death in 1893 and again after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. After WWII, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would later be known as Silicon Valley.



The university is organized around three traditional schools consisting of 40 academic departments at the undergraduate and graduate level and four professional schools that focus on graduate programs in Law, Medicine, Education and Business. Stanford's undergraduate program is one of the top three most selective in the United States. As of March 2018, 81 Nobel laureates, 27 Turing Award laureates, and 7 Fields Medalists have been affiliated with Stanford as students, alumni, faculty or staff. In addition, Stanford University is particularly noted for its entrepreneurship and is one of the most successful universities in attracting funding for start-ups.

Timeline

People

Name
Role
LinkedIn

Jaap Suermondt

Advisor



Aman Kumar

Advisor



Anthony Tran

Investor



Ayako Hiwasa

Advisor



Blas L. Pérez Henríquez

Founder



Brian Rowen

Board member



Brian Speir

Advisor



Casey Miller

Founder



Daisy Bermudez

Founder



Danise Olague

Founder



Fei-Fei Li

Advisor



ji hoon jang

Advisor



John Duhring

Advisor



Justin Klein

Advisor



Kristin McDonnell

Advisor



Laura Petree

Founder



Lynne Gregg

Advisor



Maja Zecevic, PhD, MPH

Advisor



Pulkit Jaiswal

Group member



Roman Reed

Investor



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Further reading

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The most competitive university in America isn't in the Ivy League

Abby Jackson





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News

Title
Author
Date
Publisher
Description
Cade Metz
March 23, 2020
www.nytimes.com
Technology from Amazon, Apple, Google, IBM and Microsoft misidentified 35 percent of words from people who were black. White people fared much better.
March 20, 2020
Geekologie
This is a video demonstration and discussion of a soft robot built by engineers at Stanford University that's constructed of a number of inflatable arms that, once inflated, it can use to change shape, move, and manipulate objects without...
Steven Levy
March 18, 2020
Wired
Stanford scientists are exploring whether gene-editing technology can be used to fight pandemics. But so far, they have just one piece of a larger puzzle.
Lauren Goode
March 11, 2020
Wired
The kids are alright, except for the ones who are not.
Nick Statt
March 10, 2020
The Verge
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan are funding new diagnostic machines to increase coronavirus testing in the San Francisco Bay Area through the couple's philanthropic arms.
Danny Crichton
March 7, 2020
TechCrunch
Following on the heels of several major cancellations of events the past few days, including the SXSW conference in Austin and the tech conference SaaStr, Stanford University, which is located in the heart of Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California, announced late Friday that the school would cancel in-person classes for the final two weeks of [...]
Associated Press
February 29, 2020
Boston Herald
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Joe Coulombe envisioned a new generation of young grocery shoppers emerging in the 1960s, one that wanted healthy, tasty, high-quality food they couldn't find in most supermarkets and couldn't afford to buy in the few high-end gourmet outlets.
Chris Piech
February 26, 2020
Scientific American Blog Network
How we can avert the dangers and maximize the benefits of this powerful but still emerging technology
Chris Kirkham
February 21, 2020
U.S.
At Germany's Bambi Awards for the media industry in November, celebrities posed for red-carpet photos against a backdrop of established luxury brands. Alongside the likes of Mercedes-Benz and Swiss watchmaker Chopard was a newer name: IQOS, a "reduced risk" heated-tobacco device sold by cigarette maker Philip Morris International Inc.
Elisabetta Mori
February 9, 2020
the Guardian
Peter Kirstein in March last year. He was responsible for setting up the Queen's first email account in 1976. Photograph: Elisabetta Mori
Sophie Bushwick
January 29, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Stuart Madnick
January 23, 2020
Harvard Business Review
In 2019, California showed us how costly a sustained power outage can be.
BS Web Team
January 18, 2020
@bsindia
The protestors decried the use of force against university students in India and also expressed solidarity with the women protestors of Shaheen Bagh
January 17, 2020
WebWire
The field of evolutionary biology has seen its share of spirited debates. But if there's one principle that virtually every expert in the field agrees on, it's that natural selection occurs at the level of the genome. But now, a UC San Francisco-led research team has discovered the first conclusive evidence that selection may also occur at the level of the epigenome -- a term that refers to an assortment of chemical "annotations" to the genome that determine whether, when and to what exte...
Karen Weintraub
January 17, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Charlie Wood
January 14, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Shawn Knight
January 6, 2020
TechSpot
Traditional particle accelerators utilize microwave bursts to help nudge electrons along. Microwaves measure four inches from peak to trough - far too long for their new accelerator. Instead, the team opted to use infrared light which has a wavelength of...
Sophie Bushwick
January 4, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
January 4, 2020
The Wire
Scientists at Stanford University are working on a tiny particle accelerator with potential applications in materials engineering, sterilisation and water treatment.
Will Knight
December 30, 2019
Wired
Recent progress in AI, many believe, makes the promise and peril of transhumanism increasingly possible.
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References