California

California

State of the United States

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Timeline

February 14, 2020

cKinetics acquires CaliforniaCarbon.info

September 27, 2019

EPA threatens to cut federal transportation funding from California.

May 1, 2019

US Air Force test-launches Minuteman missile from California.

The Air Force Global Strike Command says the missile was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base northwest of Los Angeles at 2:42 a.m. Wednesday.

January 2018

California legalizes cannabis.

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News

Title
Author
Date
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Description
Joseph Winters
September 28, 2020
Grist
Governor Newsom says he can't. Activists say he won't.
Gabrielle Canon
September 25, 2020
the Guardian
Firefighters position themselves on a ridge overlooking flames from the Bobcat Fire in a valley below in the Angeles national forest on Wednesday. Photograph: Frederic J Brown/AFP/Getty Images
Matt McGrath
September 24, 2020
BBC News
Climate change is behind the scale and impact of recent wildfires in the western US, scientists say.
Kristen Hall-Geisler
September 24, 2020
HowStuffWorks
Dozens of wildfires have scorched millions of acres in the western U.S. this year. One Oregonian tells what it's like living through the record season and if it's a preview of what's to come.
Yvette Cabrera
September 24, 2020
Grist
A COVID-19 relief package for California's farmworkers landed on Governor Gavin Newsom's desk last week.
Associated Press
September 23, 2020
Boston Herald
California will halt sales of new gasoline-powered passenger cars and trucks by 2035, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday, a move he says will cut greenhouse gas emissions by 35% in the nation's most populous state.
Emily Holden in Washington
September 23, 2020
the Guardian
Heat and wildfire smoke force residents to seek respite - and buy cooling systems and air purifiers, if they can afford them
Vivian Ho
September 23, 2020
the Guardian
Gavin Newsom says 'we can't continue down this path' as state grapples with historic fires and record temperatures
By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
September 19, 2020
Houston Chronicle
America's worsening climate change problem is as polarized as its politics. Some parts of the country have been burning this month while others were underwater in extreme weather disasters. The already parched West is getting drier and suffering deadly wildfires because of it, while the much wetter East keeps getting drenched in mega-rainfall events, some hurricane related and others not. Climate change is magnifying both extremes, but it may not be the only factor, several scientists told The Associated Press. "The story in the West is really going to be ... these hot dry summers getting worse and the fire compounded by decreasing precipitation,'' said Columbia University climate scientist Richard Seager. "But in the eastern part more of the climate change impact story is going to be more intense precipitation. We see it in Sally." North Carolina State climatologist Kathie Dello, a former deputy state climatologist in Oregon, this week was talking with friends abut the massive Oregon fires while she was huddled under a tent, dodging 4 inches (10 centimeters) of rain falling on the North Carolina mountains. "The things I worry about are completely different now," Dello said. "We know the West has had fires and droughts. It's hot and dry. We know the East has had hurricanes and it's typically more wet. But we're amping up both of those." In the federal government's 2017 National Climate Assessment, scientists wrote a special chapter warning of surprises due to global warming from burning of coal, oil and natural gas. And one of the first ones mentioned was "compound extreme events." "We certainly are getting extremes at the same time with climate change," said University of Illinois climate scientist Donald Wuebbles, one of the main...
Derrick Z. Jackson
September 19, 2020
Grist
On COVID, climate, and pollution, Trump zigs when the science says to zag.
WIRED
September 19, 2020
Ars Technica
Blazes on the West Coast are spewing a haze clear across the country.
Oliver Milman
September 19, 2020
the Guardian
Ricardo Gomez of Cal Fire sets a controlled burn with a drip torch while fighting the Creek fire on 6 September. Photograph: Marcio José Sánchez/AP
Scott K. Johnson
September 18, 2020
Ars Technica
NOAA's August summary covers some nasty weather and looks ahead.
Emily Pontecorvo
September 18, 2020
Grist
With wildfires raging, are forest carbon offsets still a safe bet?
The Visual and Data Journalism Team
September 17, 2020
BBC News
A visual guide to the wildfires ravaging California, Oregon and other western states.
By SARA CLINE and GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press
September 16, 2020
Houston Chronicle
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Dangerously dirty air spewing from the West Coast wildfires is seeping into homes and businesses, sneaking into cars through air conditioning vents and preventing people already shut away by the coronavirus pandemic from enjoying a walk or trip to the park. People in Oregon, Washington state and California have been struggling for a week or longer under some of the most unhealthy air on the planet. The acrid yellow-green smog may linger for days or weeks, scientists and forecasters said. It is also a sign of things to come. With wildfires getting larger and more destructive because of climate change and more people living closer to areas that burn, smoke will likely shroud the sky more often in the future. "I don't think that we should be outside, but at the same time, we've been cooped up in the house already for months, so it's kind of hard to dictate what's good and what's bad. I mean, we shouldn't be outside period," Portland resident Issa Ubidia-Luckett said Monday. The hazy air closed businesses like Whole Foods and the iconic Powell's Books in Portland and suspended garbage pickup in some communities. Pollution and fire evacuations canceled online school and closed some college campuses in Oregon. "It is so bad that you can likely smell (smoke) inside your house," said Sarah Present, the health officer for Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties. "In some areas, the air quality is so hazardous it is off the charts of the EPA's rating scale." The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality's Air Quality Index is considered hazardous between 301 and 500. Values above 500 - which multiple Oregon cities have reported during the past week - are beyond the index's scale. The air quality agency extended...
Vivian Ho in Oakland, Sam Levin in Los Angeles, and agencies
September 16, 2020
the Guardian
Fires in Oregon, Washington and California have killed more than 30, burned millions of acres and enveloped region in smoke
Joseph Winters
September 15, 2020
Grist
A new bill makes it possible for them to obtain the state license necessary to work in a municipal firefighting department.
Lynne Peeples
September 15, 2020
the Guardian
California resident Florencia Ramos has been purchasing drinking water for herself and her family for more than a decade Photograph: Gary Kazanjian/Ensia
By MATTHEW BROWN, Associated Press
September 15, 2020
Houston Chronicle
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) - Federal courts have delivered a string of rebukes to the Trump administration over what they found were failures to protect the environment and address climate change as it promotes fossil fuel interests and the extraction of natural resources from public lands. Judges have ruled administration officials ignored or downplayed potential environmental damage in lawsuits over oil and gas leases, coal mining and pipelines to transport fuels across the U.S., according to an Associated Press review of more than a dozen major environmental cases. The latest ruling against the administration came Thursday when an appeals court refused to revive a permitting program for oil and gas pipelines that a lower court had canceled. Actions taken by the courts have ranged from orders for more environmental analysis to the unprecedented cancellation of oil and gas leases across hundreds of thousands of acres in Western states. "Many of the decisions the Trump administration has been making are arguably illegal and in some cases blatantly so," said Mark Squillace, associate dean at the University of Colorado Law School and a specialist in natural resources law. "They've lost a lot of cases." Some of the most far-reaching rulings have come from U.S. District Judge Brian Morris, an appointee of former President Barack Obama posted in Montana. This month alone Morris canceled energy leases on several hundred thousand acres in cases that centered on potential harm to water supplies and greater sage grouse, a declining species. He also struck down the nationwide permitting program for new oil and gas pipelines in a lawsuit against the controversial Keystone XL oil sands pipeline from Canada. The The rulings brought cheers from environmentalists who have...
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