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Columbia University

Columbia University

Private ivy league research university in new york city

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Isabel B. Slone
October 7, 2021
Canadian Business - How to Do Business Better
Real estate entrepreneur Anshul Ruparell is changing the way Canadians sell homes with his start-up, Properly.
Jennifer Ouellette
September 23, 2021
Ars Technica
Setup can't synthesize complete meals like the Star Trek Replicator, but it's a start
By MICHAEL LIEDTKE and BARBARA ORTUTAY
September 8, 2021
AP NEWS
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Technology companies that led the charge into remote work as the pandemic unfurled are confronting a new challenge as the crisis winds down: how, when and even whether they should bring long-isolated employees back to offices that have been designed for teamwork.
MICHAEL LIEDTKE and BARBARA ORTUTAY AP Technology Writers
September 8, 2021
ABC News
Thriving Silicon Valley companies were among the first to embrace remote work during the pandemic, but they've struggled over how to recall their high-paid employees to the office
By JOE McDONALD
September 8, 2021
AP NEWS
BEIJING (AP) -- An avalanche of changes launched by China's ruling Communist Party has jolted everyone from tech billionaires to school kids. Behind them: President Xi Jinping's vision of making a more powerful, prosperous country by reviving revolutionary ideals, with more economic equality and tighter party control over society and entrepreneurs.
Renee Cho
August 27, 2021
phys.org
The United States and many other parts of the world are reeling under the impacts of severe drought. One possible solution is the desalination of seawater, but is it a silver bullet?
Jeremy Hinsdale
August 27, 2021
phys.org
Floods, tornadoes and hurricanes cause deaths every year, but when it comes to weather-related fatalities, extreme heat is America's deadliest killer. And the mercury is rising due to climate change: unprecedented heatwaves killed hundreds across Western North America this summer, making it one of the deadliest on record.
August 26, 2021
The Indian Express
One drawback could be that if too many weather events have names, the message could get lost, said Suzana J. Camargo, an adjunct professor at Columbia University's Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.
Science X staff
August 20, 2021
phys.org
American states that ended pandemic jobless benefits early saw slight dips in unemployment rates but big declines in spending and income, according to a study released Friday, in what could be a preview of the effects nationwide when the programs end completely.
Sarah Fecht
August 20, 2021
phys.org
The impacts of climate change strike hardest in socially and economically vulnerable communities; knowing this, researchers have constructed a variety of indices to try to identify populations most at risk. These datasets often rely on demographic data, but leave out important financial and real estate information that could help to identify communities where vulnerable groups could be pushed out by rising flood insurance rates or shifting real estate values.
Alexander C. Kaufman
August 14, 2021
HuffPost
The latest global climate report makes clear we need to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, and "planting trees" won't be enough.
Adam Pasick
August 13, 2021
www.nytimes.com
A new portfolio from Opinion and the newsroom will expand our ambitions in an age-old medium.
Science X staff
August 12, 2021
phys.org
For years, it seemed the world was making progress eliminating hunger. Then, starting in 2014, the trend slid back slowly and reversed in many nations; now, some 700 million people--nearly 9 percent of the world's population--go to bed hungry, according to the UN.
Science X staff
August 9, 2021
phys.org
One of the current mysteries of climate science surrounds the widely accepted evidence that during the planet's most recent past natural warm period, about 128,000 to 117,000 years ago, global sea levels peaked as high as 6 to 9 meters (20 or 30 feet) higher than today. And, during that so-called last interglacial, temperatures were just 1or 2 degrees C (1.8 to 3.6 F) warmer than those of preindustrial times--marks we may surpass by century's end, if not sooner. Such a deluge could have been produced only by collapses of the Greenland and/or Antarctic ice sheets. If that happens now, it will drown much of the human world. Yet, at least so far, models of future sea level rise generally hover around a meter or so within the next 100 years. What are we missing, and how much should it scare us?
Science X staff
August 4, 2021
phys.org
Researchers from Columbia University, University of Southern California, and Sotheby's published a paper in the Journal of Marketing that introduces a new tool that measures the relevance of academic marketing articles to marketing practice, both in terms of topical and timely relevance.
Deborah Warner
August 2, 2021
www.smithsonianmag.com
Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe, but how do you hold it?
Alexandra Witze, Nature magazine
July 26, 2021
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
BioSpace
July 1, 2021
BioSpace
Veracyte hat expand and further strengthen the company's medical team. William A. Bulman, M.D. and Paul Kelly Marcom, M.D, have joined the company as medical director for Lung Cancer and medical director for Breast Cancer, respectively.
Douglas Fox
June 29, 2021
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Daniel Cusick, E&E News
June 23, 2021
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
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