Columbia University

Private ivy league research university in new york city

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By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
September 19, 2020
Houston Chronicle
America's worsening climate change problem is as polarized as its politics. Some parts of the country have been burning this month while others were underwater in extreme weather disasters. The already parched West is getting drier and suffering deadly wildfires because of it, while the much wetter East keeps getting drenched in mega-rainfall events, some hurricane related and others not. Climate change is magnifying both extremes, but it may not be the only factor, several scientists told The Associated Press. "The story in the West is really going to be ... these hot dry summers getting worse and the fire compounded by decreasing precipitation,'' said Columbia University climate scientist Richard Seager. "But in the eastern part more of the climate change impact story is going to be more intense precipitation. We see it in Sally." North Carolina State climatologist Kathie Dello, a former deputy state climatologist in Oregon, this week was talking with friends abut the massive Oregon fires while she was huddled under a tent, dodging 4 inches (10 centimeters) of rain falling on the North Carolina mountains. "The things I worry about are completely different now," Dello said. "We know the West has had fires and droughts. It's hot and dry. We know the East has had hurricanes and it's typically more wet. But we're amping up both of those." In the federal government's 2017 National Climate Assessment, scientists wrote a special chapter warning of surprises due to global warming from burning of coal, oil and natural gas. And one of the first ones mentioned was "compound extreme events." "We certainly are getting extremes at the same time with climate change," said University of Illinois climate scientist Donald Wuebbles, one of the main...
Adam Mann
September 2, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Kenneth Chang
August 31, 2020
www.nytimes.com
The New York-based scientist overcame sexism and personal tragedy to make major contributions to the field, for which she received recognition this year.
Danny Crichton
July 27, 2020
TechCrunch
Everyone wants more bandwidth from the skies, but it takes a lot of testing to turn laboratory research projects into real-world performant infrastructure. A number of new technologies, sometimes placed under the banner of "5G" and sometimes not, is embarking on that transition and being deployed in real-world scenarios. Those research trials are crucial for [...]
Sarah Farooqui
July 19, 2020
@bsindia
Broader effects of Covid on human body, Keralas plan to manage community transfer, and ensuring every citizen gets the vaccine when it is ready-how India is dealing with the pandemic
Joshua Austin Acklin
July 12, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Gary Yohe
July 10, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
By Jonathan Chadwick For Mailonline
June 29, 2020
Mail Online
The machine uses a type of short-wavelength ultraviolet light called UVC to kill microorganisms and disrupt their DNA in a process known as 'ultraviolet germicidal irradiation'.
June 19, 2020
WebWire
Four leading cancer investigators are recipients of the American Cancer Society research professorship, a lifelong designation accompanied by a five-year award totaling $400,000. The awards are the most prestigious research grants made by the American Cancer Society's Extramural Grants program. Two are new awardees and two are renewals of previous professorships. The new awardees are: , , , , , , • Dawn Hershman, M.D., Columbia University : Dr. Hershman's seminal contributions to cancer have...
Dennis Overbye
June 17, 2020
www.nytimes.com
Do signals from beneath an Italian mountain herald a revolution in physics?
Nick Greenhalgh
June 3, 2020
AmericanInno
Lafayette's Cardinal Peak donated engineering services to Columbia University to support the school's effort to develop CovidWatcher.
June 3, 2020
The Wire Science
In the last 13 or so years, astronomers have proposed an extraordinary number of theories to explain their origins - all the way to aliens communicating across galaxies.
By Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline
June 1, 2020
Mail Online
Researchers from Columbia University found the process of going grey can be reversed in hairs that have only recently turned grey.
Agencies
May 27, 2020
@bsindia
Adam H. Sobel, Atmospheric scientist at the Columbia University has also anticipated a cyclone over the Arabian Sea, early next week.
Scott Barry Kaufman
May 24, 2020
Scientific American Blog Network
New research highlights the profound effect of severe social isolation on the brain
May 22, 2020
Hindustan Times
The company through its marketing partner in the US, Rising Pharmaceuticals will donate Chloroquine Phosphate (CQ) tablets to support the Phase 2 of a clinical trial at Columbia University, Natco Pharma said in a regulatory filing.
Cassandra Willyard
May 11, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
BioSpace
May 8, 2020
BioSpace
Oncogenuity, Inc., a Fortress partner company, enters into an agreement with Columbia University to develop a broad platform technology using oligonucleotides Initial target is KRAS-driven cancers, often considered "un-druggable" Platform being explored as a treatment for coronaviruses, including COVID-19 NEW YORK, May 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Fortress Biotech, Inc. (Nasdaq: FBIO) ("Fortress"), an innovative biopharmaceutical company, today announced that Oncogenuity, Inc. ("Oncog
May 4, 2020
BioSpace
Praxis Precision Medicines Launches with over $100 Million to Advance Pipeline of High Impact Therapies for Brain Disorders - read this article along with other careers information, tips and advice on BioSpace
Nick Paul
May 8, 2020
FierceBiotech
Fortress Biotech has licensed a treatment for KRAS-driven cancers from Columbia University. Sticking to its blueprint, Fortress has set up a new biotech, Oncogenuity, to advance the preclinical asset and work to generate more oligonucleotides from the underlying platform.
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