University

University

Academic institution for further education

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Adrienne Matei
October 26, 2020
the Guardian
Around 70% of the world's population will live in urban areas by 2050. Simulated nature is better than none - but it's not nature
Amelia Hill
October 22, 2020
the Guardian
Children's mental health worsened during lockdown, the survey found, especially among those receiving less help from schools. Photograph: Richard Saker/The Guardian
Beth Mole
October 21, 2020
Ars Technica
It could help understand infection, but experts are skeptical it will speed vaccines.
Natalie Grover Science correspondent
October 20, 2020
the Guardian
Chris Holdsworth, a 25-year-old volunteer who is studying for a PhD at the University of Edinburgh. Photograph: Laura Thompson
Nathanael Johnson
October 19, 2020
Grist
Did California's landmark legislation help or hurt the state's most vulnerable?
Linda Geddes
October 18, 2020
the Guardian
One theory is that white noise helps to drown out other bothersome sounds such as street noise. Photograph: Johan Larson/Alamy
Dennis Overbye
October 15, 2020
www.nytimes.com
He was a scientist who succeeded in seeing the unseeable and hoped to tune in to extraterrestrial life.
Fox News
October 14, 2020
Fox News
Army researchers are working with the University of Illinois Chicago on unmanned technology for recharging drone swarms.
PA Media
October 9, 2020
the Guardian
Open letter calling for new Covid-19 strategy also signed by 'Cominic Dummings'
Linda Geddes Science correspondent
October 8, 2020
the Guardian
A billboard in Watford, Hertfordshire, in April. The Edinburgh university study argued that lockdown solved an immediate crisis but did not provide a long-term solution. Photograph: Jonathan Hordle/Rex/Shutterstock
Melissa Davey
October 4, 2020
the Guardian
Australia's 'no jab no pay' policy has seen a drop in first-dose measles, mumps and rubella vaccinations. Photograph: Burger/Phanie / Rex
Tina Reed
October 1, 2020
FierceHealthcare
Turns out, the gender disparity in primary care doc pay may actually be attributed to the amount of time female primary care docs spend with their patients, according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Emily Pontecorvo
October 1, 2020
Grist
Hint: They aren't stoping at fossil fuels.
Colin McClelland
September 30, 2020
Financial Post
Properly is playing the technology disruption card to smooth real estate deals
Oliver Milman
September 30, 2020
the Guardian
Record-breaking wildfires and hurricanes were just the most high-profile effects of global heating - and this is just the start
Jennifer Ouellette
September 29, 2020
Ars Technica
Ceramic pots retained remnants of last meal cooked, plus clues as to earlier meals.
By MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer
September 26, 2020
Houston Chronicle
NEW YORK (AP) - At a University of Maryland lab, people infected with the new coronavirus take turns sitting in a chair and putting their faces into the big end of a large cone. They recite the alphabet and sing or just sit quietly for a half hour. Sometimes they cough. The cone sucks up everything that comes out of their mouths and noses. It's part of a device called "Gesundheit II" that is helping scientists study a big question: Just how does the virus that causes COVID-19 spread from one person to another? It clearly hitchhikes on small liquid particles sprayed out by an infected person. People expel particles while coughing, sneezing, singing, shouting, talking and even breathing. But the drops come in a wide range of sizes, and scientists are trying to pin down how risky the various kinds are. The answer affects what we should all be doing to avoid getting sick. That's why it was thrust into headlines a few days ago when a U.S. health agency appeared to have shifted its position on the issue, but later said it had published new language in error. The recommendation to stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) apart - some authorities cite about half that distance - is based on the idea that larger particles fall to the ground before they can travel very far. They are like the droplets in a spritz of a window cleaner, and they can infect somebody by landing on their nose, mouth or eyes, or maybe being inhaled. But some scientists are now focusing on tinier particles, the ones that spread more like cigarette smoke. Those are carried by wisps of air and even upward drafts caused by the warmth of our bodies. They can linger in the air for minutes to hours, spreading throughout a room and build up if ventilation is poor. The potential risk comes from inhaling them. Measles can spread this way, but the new...
Linda Geddes Science correspondent
September 25, 2020
the Guardian
Dr Allen Haddrell and Henry Oswin (seated) check the Celebs equipment ahead of the study, due to begin on Monday. Photograph: Sam Frost/The Guardian
Brand Post
September 23, 2020
CIO
The pandemic response will catalyze changes for years to come
Robert Lewis and Christina Jewett
September 23, 2020
the Guardian
Healthcare workers at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas. Photograph: Mark Felix/AFP/Getty Images
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