Harvard University

Harvard University

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Avi Loeb
May 25, 2020
Scientific American Blog Network
The ability to come up with truly revolutionary ideas is crucial--and extremely rare
Arlene Weintraub
May 21, 2020
FierceBiotech
Two animal studies out of Harvard showed DNA vaccines against COVID-19 generated similar levels of antibodies that can neutralize the virus as the actual infection does. That will likely fuel enthusiasm for efforts to rapidly develop vaccines against the disease, though the researchers warned there are still several unanswered questions.
BioSpace
May 19, 2020
BioSpace
Continuing collaboration with engineers at Harvard addresses telehealth needs for rehabilitation and physical therapy in wake of COVID-19
BioSpace
October 2, 2019
BioSpace
uBiome, Inc., announced that it has requested that the Bankruptcy Court presiding over its pending Chapter 11 bankruptcy convert its case to a liquidation under Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.
Noam Cohen
May 4, 2020
Wired
An internal investigation from Harvard University shows where the corrupt philanthropist really wanted to get in.
Thomas Lewton
May 3, 2020
Wired
The Hubble constant predicts how rapidly space should grow--but astronomical observations don't line up. Here are the top ideas about what might be going on.
Avi Loeb
April 30, 2020
Scientific American Blog Network
Call it the Science Readiness Reserves--a group that will anticipate and prepare for rare but disastrous events like pandemics, asteroid strikes and more
Will Dunham
April 29, 2020
U.S.
The huge African predator Spinosaurus spent much of its life in the water, propelled by a paddle-like tail while hunting large fish - a "river monster," according to scientists, that showed that some dinosaurs invaded the aquatic realm.
Ram Shankar Siva Kumar
April 29, 2020
Harvard Business Review
Existing plans might not cover the risks posed by these new technologies.
Joseph G. Allen
April 29, 2020
Harvard Business Review
How organizations can meet people's new expectations of their workplace.
Max H. Bazerman
April 29, 2020
Harvard Business Review
Three guidelines for policymakers and physicians making life-or-death decisions.
April 28, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
April 23, 2020
Social News XYZ
New York, April 23 (SocialNews.XYZ) The Earth's tectonic plates started moving more than 3.2 billion years ago - just over 1.3 billion years after the Earth first formed and earlier than originally thought, researchers have... - Social News XYZ
Ilana Cohen, Connor Chung and Joseph Winters
April 22, 2020
the Guardian
'It's clear that we need to end the fossil fuel economy, and replace it with one that is built with environmental sustainability and social equity as foundational principles.' Photograph: Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images
Navin Singh Khadka
April 20, 2020
BBC News
The World Health Organization warns high air pollution could be a risk factor for severe Covid-19 cases.
Dom Calicchio
April 15, 2020
Fox News
Are you getting accustomed to keeping at least six feet of space between yourself and other people to help stop the spread of coronavirus? Good. Because you may need to keep doing it, on and off, until 2022.
Alexander W. Bartik
April 13, 2020
Harvard Business Review
In the face of existential uncertainty, you must balance urgency with prudence.
By Ryan Morrison For Mailonline
April 13, 2020
Mail Online
Harvard University researchers found that women born by c-section face an 11 per cent higher risk of obesity and a 46 per cent greater risk of type 2 diabetes.
April 8, 2020
ThePrint
Covid-19 patients in regions with a history of high air pollution are more likely to succumb to the disease, claims the new study by Harvard University.
Naomi Oreskes
April 7, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
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