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National Science Foundation

National Science Foundation

National Science Foundation is a United States government agency founded in 1950.

The National Science Foundation is a government agency that looks to promote national security, health, prosperity, science, and welfare, in 1950, in Alexandria, Virginia, United States.

The agency works with a seven million dollar budget to complete and progress work in biological sciences, computer and information science, education, engineering, geosciences, international science, physical sciences, social behaviors, STEM, and more.

Timeline

November 19, 2020
The National Science Foundation announces that it will close the huge telescope at the renowned Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico in a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it to search for planets, asteroids and extraterrestrial life.

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Avi Chaudhuri

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Brandon Dewitt

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Cheng-Han Lee

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Denali Lumma

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Evan Roberts

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Francisco J. Luna

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Gennaro Leo

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JohnPaul Bennett

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Landon Young

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Lauren White

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Lindsay D'Ambrosio

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Murali Nair

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Peter Weyand

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August 3, 2021
AP NEWS
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) -- The National Science Foundation has awarded more than $982,000 for two research projects at West Virginia State University, the state's two U.S. senators announced."The National Science Foundation continues to be a strong partner for West Virginia universities and colleges through their support for critical research and efforts to foster educational opportunities for students across the Mountain State," Democratic Sen.
Brandon May
June 29, 2021
BioSpace
On Monday, the House passed a bipartisan bill designed to reportedly boost scientific research and increase the scientific competitiveness of the U.S. to that of China.
Catie Edmondson
June 28, 2021
www.nytimes.com
The legislation would invest in traditional research and development, clashing with a broad Senate measure that focuses on cutting-edge technology to compete with China.
Platforms for Advanced Wireless Research (PAWR)
June 22, 2021
www.prnewswire.com:443
/PRNewswire/ -- The Platforms for Advanced Wireless Research (PAWR) program, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and an industry consortium of 35...
Manish Parashar, Amy Friedlander
June 2, 2021
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
TERC
May 11, 2021
www.prnewswire.com:443
/PRNewswire/ -- Researchers, practitioners, policy makers, informal educators, and parents interested in enhancing STEM education are invited to take part in a...
Science X staff
May 7, 2021
phys.org
Cosmologists have found a way to double the accuracy of measuring distances to supernova explosions--one of their tried-and-true tools for studying the mysterious dark energy that is making the universe expand faster and faster. The results from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) collaboration, led by Greg Aldering of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), will enable scientists to study dark energy with greatly improved precision and accuracy, and provide a powerful crosscheck of the technique across vast distances and time. The findings will also be central to major upcoming cosmology experiments that will use new ground and space telescopes to test alternative explanations of dark energy.
Science X staff
April 20, 2021
phys.org
Water touches virtually every aspect of human society, and all life on earth requires it. Yet, fresh, clean water is becoming increasingly scarce--one in eight people on the planet lack access to clean water. Drivers of freshwater salt pollution such as de-icers on roads and parking lots, water softeners, and wastewater and industrial discharges further threaten freshwater ecosystem health and human water security.
BioSpace
April 20, 2021
BioSpace
Axion BioSystems, a leading life science tools company focused on developing and commercializing label-free, bioelectronic assays used to study the function of live cells in vitro, announces the formation of a Scientific Advisory Board.
Science X staff
April 14, 2021
phys.org
In 2019, a worldwide collaboration of scientists used a global collection of radio telescopes called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) to make the first-ever image of a black hole--the supermassive black hole at the core of the galaxy M87, some 55 million light-years from Earth. This long-sought achievement was an important scientific landmark. However, any image at a single wavelength can give only a partial picture of the entire phenomenon.
Science X staff
April 12, 2021
phys.org
Science is essential to solving many of society's biggest problems, but it doesn't always find a receptive audience. Today, when curbing COVID-19 requires hundreds of millions of Americans to get vaccinated, it's more urgent than ever for scientists to be able to communicate effectively with the public.
Conn, R. W.
April 2, 2021
Science
This month, the U.S. Senate is poised to consider legislation that would expand the National Science Foundation (NSF) and strengthen the U.S. science and technology research ecosystem. The heart of the legislation will be the Endless Frontier Act (EFA), a bipartisan and bicameral bill that was first introduced to the previous Congress in May 2020. With some modifications, this legislation could become a landmark achievement that bolsters U.S. competitiveness. The bill would authorize $100 billion over 5 years for a new Directorate for Technology to support basic science motivated by critical needs, often referred to as "use-inspired" basic research. The initial areas of focus would include artificial intelligence, quantum information sciences, and advanced materials. In addition to other provisions that protect NSF's current mission and budget ($8.5 billion in fiscal year 2021), the bill requires that the Directorate for Technology provide a minimum of 15% of its annual funds to enhance NSF's existing areas of curiosity-driven research in its existing directorates. The new directorate also would fund academic research both by individuals and centers; offer support to undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctorals; and enable universities to develop new ways to spin off and support companies on the basis of their discoveries and inventions. Over the past 7 months, a group of scientific leaders that David Baltimore and I assembled[*][1] has been reviewing the bill and meeting with key people in Congress. We developed a short list of changes that would better ensure the success of the bill and its intentions. Our concerns are substantial but still minor in comparison with the benefits that the EFA would confer on the nation's science and technology enterprise. Maintaining NSF's unity of structure is critical--a single director and board that makes certain that the agency's work is greater than the sum of its parts. With this in mind, we do not support a provision in the May 2020 version that creates a Senate-confirmed head of the new Directorate for Technology who might be viewed as outranking the other directorate leaders and possibly competing with the NSF director. As well, a proposed new advisory board that includes congressionally appointed members would be equally disruptive. The legislation also changes NSF's name to the National Science and Technology Foundation. We recommend that the agency's well-recognized name NSF be preserved unchanged, given its acclaimed history and position in science. The bill does protect NSF's existing programs, and these could be further strengthened. For example, it prevents the Directorate for Technology from making new grants if budgets for the existing directorates are not maintained. The bill could also stipulate additional funding for these directorates to ensure that NSF's budget does not become too weighted toward use-inspired basic research. And Congress should design the ramp-up of the Directorate for Technology's budget in a manner that gives stability and reasonable predictability commensurate with the long-term nature of basic scientific work. The bill's education language should be strengthened to encourage needed experimentation in the way that students are trained. With the country's history of underrepresentation of many groups in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), the new bill should promote new ideas garnered from experts in this area to attract diverse students into STEM fields. This is not only the right thing to do but would address the losses that the United States suffers when a substantial portion of the population is not welcomed into the nation's scientific enterprise. Also, the bill should encourage graduate programs to give students experience in industry and government as part of their training, and it should fund more professional, but not high-fee, professional master's programs, especially in engineering. We urge the scientific community to give the EFA its constructive attention and its vocal support. The Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities both support the bill and provide helpful summaries as a guide. We have provided recommendations to congressional committees as well. This is a rare moment, a once-in-a-generation opportunity to enhance the nation's research enterprise and adapt it to current challenges for the benefit of the country and the world. We urge our colleagues to engage now. [1]: #fn-1
Science X staff
December 22, 2020
phys.org
The supersharp radio 'vision' of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) has revealed previously unseen details in a jet of material ejected at three-quarters the speed of light from the core of a galaxy some 12.8 billion light-years from Earth. The galaxy, dubbed PSO J0309+27, is a blazar, with its jet pointed toward Earth, and is the brightest radio-emitting blazar yet seen at such a distance. It also is the second-brightest X-ray emitting blazar at such a distance.
Joann Adkins
December 22, 2020
phys.org
Heather Bracken-Grissom is having a crabalicious holiday season.
alpha-En Corporation
December 7, 2020
www.prnewswire.com:443
/PRNewswire/ -- alpha-En Corporation has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant for $255,737 to...
Dánica Coto
December 1, 2020
phys.org
A huge radio telescope in Puerto Rico that has long played a key role in astronomical discoveries collapsed on Tuesday, officials said.
Molly Sharlach
November 30, 2020
phys.org
While the mesmerizing blobs in a classic lava lamp may appear magical, the colorful shapes move in response to temperature-induced changes in density and surface tension. This process, known as liquid-liquid phase separation, is critical to many functions in living cells, and plays a part in making products like medicines and cosmetics.
Andrew Tarantola
November 20, 2020
Engadget
Structural engineers and repair crews have done all that they can but the end result is as we feared: the Arecibo radio telescope has to come down. The venerable space observatory has been out of commission since August when a cable atop Tower 4, which supports the platform, snapped and gutted a 100-foot long section from the telescope's reflecting dish. At the time, the University of Florida, which runs the facility on behalf of the National Science Foundation, deployed three different engineering teams to investigate the problem.
Dennis Overbye
November 19, 2020
www.nytimes.com
The radio telescope in Puerto Rico has to come down before it collapses.
Associated Press
November 19, 2020
NBC News
The National Science Foundation announced Thursday that it will close the huge telescope at the renowned Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.
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