AnyVision

AnyVision

A software company using artificial intelligence to create a computer vision platform for customer onboarding and security. It was founded in 2015 and is located in Holon, Israel.

About

AnyVision is an Israel-based company specializing in developing platforms that harness artificial intelligence and other technologies to create a product which can recognize faces, objects, and humans in crowded contexts. In addition to its office in Israel, the company also has locations in New York and Belfast.

Product

The company has four recognition platforms: Better Tomorrow, SesaMe, Abraxas, and Insights.

Better Tomorrow is an automated watch list alerting system that can be integrated into existing cameras. It identifies persons of interest in crowded spaces and their contact history, both in real-time and historically.

SeasMe is another platform that can be used by businesses for customer onboarding and authentication. It is a software development kit that allows for businesses and organizations to complete the process of identity verification.

Abraxas is a software that is meant to be used at entry points of buildings. It is a touchless access control solution that uses facial recognition to open guarded points of entry for authorized people.

Insights is a platform for analyzing data that is collected by cameras. It is meant to be used by businesses to optimize merchandising, real estate, and return on investment.

Timeline

December 2019

AnyVision wins Data & Storage ASEAN award.

The company wins an award for Best Use of AI in a Software Product.

2015

AnyVision is founded.

Funding rounds

Funding round
Funding type
Funding round amount (USD)
Funding round date
Investment
AnyVision Funding Round 2019
74,000,000
June 18, 2019
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Products

Product
Description
Launch date
Website
Industry
SesaMe

A customer onboarding and authentication SDK that makes accessing services on personal devices safer, faster and easier through privacy-compliant facial recognition.

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People

Name
Role
LinkedIn

Further reading

Title
Author
Link
Type
Date

AnyVision biometric software reminds visitors to wear masks in hospital

Luana Pascu

Web

September 2, 2020

Israeli Facial Recognition Tech Startup AnyVision Raises Additional $43M

Web

September 7, 2020

Documentaries, videos and podcasts

Title
Date
Link

AnyVision - company intro

March 5, 2019

Companies

Company
CEO
Location
Products/Services

News

Title
Author
Date
Publisher
Description
David M. Halbfinger
May 7, 2020
www.nytimes.com
The country has engaged defense contractors, doctors, engineers, scientists -- and most of the senses -- in its battle against the coronavirus.
Anthony Ha
March 30, 2020
TechCrunch
The FDA approves a new procedure that could allow healthcare workers to reuse N95 respirator masks, Microsoft divests from a facial recognition startup and Saudi spies have been taking advantage of a network security flaw. Here's your Daily Crunch for March 30, 2020. 1. FDA grants emergency authorization to system that decontaminates N95 respirator masks [...]
Reuters Editorial
March 27, 2020
U.S.
Microsoft Corp said on Friday it was divesting its stake in Israeli facial recognition startup AnyVision and that it was updating its policies so it no longer would make minority investments in companies that sell the controversial technology.
Ashley Stewart
December 4, 2019
Business Insider
Microsoft is investigating a startup it invested in called AnyVision. Microsoft's Brad Smith revealed details about the deal and explained the stakes.
Ashley Stewart
November 15, 2019
Business Insider
AnyVision's tech is reportedly responsible for secretly monitoring Palestinian residents in the West Bank. The company has denied this.
Aaron Holmes
October 28, 2019
Business Insider
Microsoft funded an Israeli startup that makes facial recognition reportedly used to secretly watch Palestinians living in the West Bank.
Tom Simonite, Gregory Barber
October 17, 2019
Wired
A growing number of districts are deploying cameras and software to prevent attacks. But the systems are also used to monitor students, and adult critics.

References

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