Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun

A computer scientist working on machine learning and computer vision.

Yann LeCun is a French computer scientist. He is an expert in the field of Machine Learning, Computer Vision, Mobile Robotics, Computational Neuroscience, Data Compression, Digital Libraries, the Physics of Computation, and all the applications of machine learning (Vision, Speech, Language, Document understanding, Data Mining, Bioinformatics).

He is the director of Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research (FAIR). He is a Professor of Computer Science, Neural Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Center for Neural Science, and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, NYU School of Engineering , New York University. And he is also the founding Director of NYU Center for Data Science.

He received a Diplôme d'Ingénieur from the Ecole Superieure d'Ingénieur en Electrotechnique et Electronique (ESIEE), Paris in 1983, a Diplôme d'Etudes Approfondies (DEA) from Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris in 1984 and PhD in Computer Science from the same university in 1987.

Timeline

July 8, 1960

Yann LeCun was born in Paris.

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Craig S. Smith
April 8, 2020
www.nytimes.com
Scientists are exploring approaches that would help machines develop their own sort of common sense.
CADE METZ
March 27, 2019
www.nytimes.com
For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.
CADE METZ
March 27, 2019
www.nytimes.com
For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.
CADE METZ
March 27, 2019
www.nytimes.com
For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.
By MICHAEL LIEDTKE
March 27, 2019
AP NEWS
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Computers have become so smart during the past 20 years that people don't think twice about chatting with digital assistants like Alexa and Siri or seeing their friends...
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