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Enrico Fermi

Enrico Fermi

Italian physicist

Enrico Fermi (1901 Rome, Italy - November 28, 1954, Chicago, USA) - Italian and American physicist, best known for creating the world's first nuclear reactor, who made a great contribution to the development of nuclear physics, elementary physics particles, quantum and statistical mechanics. Considered one of the "fathers of the atomic bomb". During his life, he received several patents related to the use of atomic energy.

Timeline

November 28, 1954
Fermi dies.
October 30, 1949
Fermi's advisory committee counsels against pursuing a thermonuclear bomb.
July 16, 1945
The first plutonium bomb is tested.
July 1, 1945
Fermi accepts a position at the University of Chicago.
August 1944
Fermi joins the Manhattan Project.
December 2, 1942
The first nuclear chain reaction takes place.
January 1939
Fermi discovers how to create an atomic chain reaction.
December 1938
Fermi is awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and emigrates to America.
March 1934
Fermi experiments with nuclear fission.
July 19, 1928
Fermi marries Laura Capon.

Patents

Further reading

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Documentaries, videos and podcasts

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News

Title
Author
Date
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Description
Caleb Scharf
December 30, 2019
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
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