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Albert Einstein

American, Swiss mathematician, physicist & philosopher, born in Germany

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March 14, 1879
Albert Einstein was born in Ulm.

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Dennis Overbye
October 4, 2021
www.nytimes.com
A recent study of black holes confirmed a fundamental prediction that the theoretical physicist made nearly five decades ago. But the ultimate award is beyond his reach.
Edited by Gadgets 360 Newsdesk
July 31, 2021
NDTV Gadgets 360
Researchers have now been able to see light being ejected from behind a supermassive black hole, 800 million light-years away from Earth. These light waves -- called "echoes" -- were detected in the form of X-rays, according to a study published in the Nature journal.
July 31, 2021
HT Tech
Black holes are infamous for swallowing even light. Nothing can escape it. Yet, in a historic development, researchers have just detected light from the back of a black hole.
Chris Price
July 28, 2021
The Telegraph
Also from this evening's Front Page newsletter: How Albert Einstein has been proven right about black holes. Sign up below
Robert Gast, Spektrum
July 13, 2021
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Science X staff
July 6, 2021
phys.org
Tantalizing evidence has been uncovered for a mysterious population of "free-floating" planets, planets that may be alone in deep space, unbound to any host star. The results include four new discoveries that are consistent with planets of similar masses to Earth, published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
Sidney Perkowitz
June 23, 2021
Nautilus
It's hard to argue with the famously authoritative Oxford English Dictionary, but its definition of physics as the "branch of...By Sidney Perkowitz
June 22, 2021
India Today
An illustration depicting merger of two small black holes. (Photo: LIGO)
June 22, 2021
India Today
An illustration depicting merger of two small black holes. (Photo: LIGO)
Science X staff
June 17, 2021
phys.org
Almost a century ago, Albert Einstein received the Nobel Prize for Physics for his explanation of the photoelectric effect. Published in 1905, Einstein's theory incorporated the idea that light is made up of particles called photons. When light impinges on matter, the electrons in the sample respond to the input of energy, and the interaction gives rise to what is known as the photoelectric effect. Light quanta (photons) are absorbed by the material and excite the bound electrons. Depending on the wavelength of the light source, this can result in the ejection of electrons. The electronic band structure of the material involved has a significant effect on the timescales of photoemission. Physicists based at Ludwig-Maximilian University (LMU) in Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) have now taken a closer look at the phenomenon of photoemission. They measured the influence of the band structure of tungsten on the dynamics of photoelectron emission, and provide theoretical interpretations of their observations.
Science X staff
June 16, 2021
phys.org
Small modeling errors may accumulate faster than previously expected when physicists combine multiple gravitational wave events (such as colliding black holes) to test Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity, suggest researchers at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. The findings, published June 16 in the journal iScience, suggest that catalogs with as few as 10 to 30 events with a signal-to-background noise ratio of 20 (which is typical for events used in this type of test) could provide misleading deviations from general relativity, erroneously pointing to new physics where none exists. Because this is close to the size of current catalogs used to assess Einstein's theory, the authors conclude that physicists should proceed with caution when performing such experiments.
Vijaysree Venkatraman
June 9, 2021
New Scientist
How did Hakeem Oluseyi move from selling drugs to teaching astrophysics at MIT? His vivid memoir sets out his journey and what he's doing to help other Black physicists
Avi Loeb
June 3, 2021
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Letters
May 30, 2021
the Guardian
Letters: All scientific observations are likely to be superseded by later scientists, writes Ian Flintoff, while Tony Maynard-Smith says that new discoveries do not prove Einstein 'wrong'
Letters
May 30, 2021
the Guardian
Letters: All scientific observations are likely to be superseded by later scientists, writes Ian Flintoff, while Tony Maynard-Smith says that new discoveries do not prove Einstein 'wrong'
Aylin Woodward
May 29, 2021
Business Insider
By imaging 226 million galaxies, astronomers have created the largest map ever of dark matter, which makes up 25% of the universe.
By Pallab Ghosh
May 27, 2021
BBC News
The most detailed map of dark matter in the Universe is puzzling physicists.
Pallab Ghosh - Science correspondent
May 27, 2021
news.yahoo.com
The most detailed map of dark matter in the Universe is puzzling physicists.
NFT Blue
May 27, 2021
www.prnewswire.com:443
/PRNewswire/ -- NFT Blue, the Beverly Hills-based world leader in NFT (non fungible tokens) digital assets rights management, is excited to announce an...
Dennis Overbye
May 27, 2021
www.nytimes.com
Recently, astronomers asked aloud which plural term would best suit the most enigmatic entity in the cosmos. The responses were plentiful.
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