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South America

South America

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By JOSHUA GOODMAN, Associated Press Writer
September 24, 2021
Chron
ABOARD THE OCEAN WARRIOR in the eastern Pacific Ocean (AP) - It's 3 a.m., and after...
By JULIE WATSON, JUAN A. LOZANO and ELLIOT SPAGAT
September 21, 2021
AP NEWS
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) -- Robins Exile downed a traditional meal of plantains and chicken at a restaurant run by Haitian immigrants, just a short walk from the walled border with the United States. He arrived the night before and went there seeking advice: Should he try to get to the U.S., or was it better to settle in Mexico?
Bob Yirka
August 31, 2021
phys.org
A team of researchers at Columbia University has shown that long-term droughts in southwestern parts of North America and in southwestern parts of South America have occurred at the same time on multiple occasions over the past 1,000 years coinciding with La Niña events. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes how they used archival data and paleoclimate proxies (materials preserved in the geologic record that can be used to estimate climate conditions) to create a climate models.
Science X staff
August 31, 2021
phys.org
A new study of two approximately 52-million-year-old fossil finds from the Green River Formation in Wyoming, U.S., has fit them into the evolutionary history of crocodiles. Biogeologists Jules Walter, Dr. Márton Rabi of the University of Tübingen, working with some other colleagues, determined the extinct species Tsoabichi greenriverensis to be an early caiman crocodile. Species of caimans living today do not occur in North America. Their family tree reflects their history of migrations and dispersals. The study has been published in the latest edition of Historical Biology.
Elizabeth Thompson
August 30, 2021
phys.org
Wildfires are increasingly common, and their smoky emissions can wreak havoc on human health. In South America, fires may cause nearly 17,000 otherwise avoidable deaths each year. Fire frequency in the Amazon basin has been linked to climate--drier conditions result in more fires--but direct human action, such as deforestation, drives up fire frequency as well.
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