New Orleans

New Orleans

Port city in orleans parish, Louisiana, United States

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By SETH BORENSTEIN, MELINDA DESLATTE and JANET McCONNAUGHEY, Associated Press
August 29, 2020
Houston Chronicle
LAKE CHARLES, La. (AP) - Hurricane Laura was a monster storm that could have, even should have, wreaked much more destruction than it did, except for a few lucky breaks and some smart thinking by Gulf Coast residents, experts say. Just before striking Louisiana, Laura wobbled. It wasn't much, maybe 15 miles (24 kilometers) for a Category 4 storm that was nearly the width of two states. But it was enough to move the worst of the storm surge east of Lake Charles and into a far less populated area. And even before that, Laura threaded a needle between well-populated New Orleans, Port Arthur and Houston and came ashore in Cameron Parish, which is the second least-populated county along the coast. The population of the average Atlantic and Gulf Coast county is 322,000 people. Cameron Parish has less than 7,000. Before Laura struck, local governments and residents took the right steps and got out of harm's way for the most part, a veteran New Orleans disaster expert said. The storm was still devastating, but not quite as catastrophic as it might have been. "It was really, really bad instead of apocalyptic," Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach said. Lauren Sylvester heeded the mandatory evacuation, leaving her townhouse in Lake Charles on Wednesday to stay with her mom in New Iberia. Between the evacuation order and the storm surge projections, she didn't want to take a risk. "On the TV, the picture kept getting worse and worse. They said it was going to be 9 feet and above. It was freaking me out so much," Sylvester said Friday. "I didn't want to be stuck in my attic with no way to get out." Her home was right in the "red zone" of 9 feet (2.7 meters) of flooding, but "it didn't happen," she said. She came home to some...
Princella Talley
August 28, 2020
Grist
A Pelican State resident reflects on lessons learned -- and actions taken -- in the 15 years since Katrina changed the way we view the most vulnerable coastal communities.
David Aaro
August 28, 2020
Fox News
Hurricane Laura has weakened to a depression, but not before causing the Mighty Mississippi River to flow backward in Louisiana earlier this week, according to a report.
Zoya Teirstein
August 27, 2020
Grist
Nowhere knows flooding like New Orleans. Here's what the city is doing with all its water.
AP| PTI
August 20, 2020
@bsindia
Jobless claims had fallen last week below 1 million for the first time since March, to 971,000
Associated Press
August 20, 2020
Boston Herald
The number of laid-off workers seeking U.S. unemployment benefits rose to 1.1 million last week after two weeks of declines, evidence that many employers are still slashing jobs as the coronavirus bedevils the U.S. economy.
FinSMEs
June 23, 2020
FinSMEs
About | Advertise | Contact | Disclaimer | News | The Daily Deal Newsletter FinSMEs.com by FinSMEs is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Our Foreign Staff
June 14, 2020
The Telegraph
Destruction is part of a nationwide effort to remove monuments to the Confederacy or with links to slavery
Dave Roos
June 10, 2020
HowStuffWorks
Controversy surrounds the removal of public monuments honoring the U.S. Confederacy. But who or what determines which monuments go up or come down?
By Michael Thomsen For Dailymail.com
May 26, 2020
Mail Online
A new study of the Louisiana marshlands outside New Orleans says the region has already passed its tipping point and could be completely submerged within 50 years.
Shira Ovide
May 20, 2020
www.nytimes.com
Technology with potentially the biggest impact is often humdrum stuff that drags businesses and government agencies into the age of Google Maps and Zoom.
May 7, 2020
WebWire
In "Buried Worlds with Don Wildman," the iconic Travel Channel host takes his thirst for adventure into terrifying new territory to explore mankind's darkest mysteries. In his newest series premiering on Travel Channel on Monday, June 8 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, Wildman is on a mission of a more cryptic sort, heading to remote regions of Peru, Haiti, Bulgaria and beyond - visiting the dark chasms and caverns of the paranormal and supernatural, tracking alleged lingering ghosts, devilish demons,...
David Sax
April 21, 2020
Wired
For New Orleans entrepreneur Jesseca Dupart, social media isn't just a tool for building her business--it's a platform for inspiring other black women to do the same.
April 19, 2020
NDTV.com
American families slammed by the coronavirus pandemic are turning more and more to food banks to get by, waiting hours for donations in lines of cars stretching as far as the eye can see.
Brad Brooks
March 30, 2020
U.S.
Emergency room doctor Thomas Krajewski stopped at the hospital room door at 2 a.m. to glance at the chart. He knew instantly the long odds faced by the patient inside: A man in his 70s, with a fever, short of breath.
Reuters
March 26, 2020
@bsindia
The rate of hospitalizations in New York has slowed in recent days, Cuomo said, with numbers he called almost too good to be true. But he said much more work needed to be done
Arielle Pardes
March 9, 2020
Wired
As more gatherings get shut down due to Covid-19, a new group of companies are trying to re-create the experience online. Hotel cocktail not included.
Marisa Meltzer
February 21, 2020
www.nytimes.com
With a cult following on Instagram, Jayne Matthews gives $325 cuts to a far-flung clientele.
By Michael Thomsen For Dailymail.com
February 21, 2020
Mail Online
NASA has announced a new project to study the effects of rising sea levels on the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana, which has had more than 5,000 square miles of land go underwater.
Roy S. Johnson
February 5, 2020
www.nytimes.com
He designed and built some of the best-known courses in segregated Louisiana. But though he loved the game, he was never permitted to play those courses.
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