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Biology

Study of life

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Science X staff
July 28, 2021
phys.org
Mitofusin 2 is a key protein in the regulation of the physiology of mitochondria--cellular organelles that produce energy--involved in several neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as in cancer. Now, a study published in the journal EMBO Reports reveals that the regulation of the bioenergetic activity in the mitochondria requires mitofusin 2 to be found in the endoplasmic reticulum, a system built by a complex network of membranes in the cell cytoplasm
Science X staff
July 2, 2021
phys.org
Nitrogen is essential for all life on Earth. In the global oceans however, this element is scarce, and nitrogen availability is therefore critical for the growth of marine life. Some bacteria found in marine waters can convert nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonia (known as N2 fixation), and thereby supply the marine food web with nitrogen.
Science X staff
June 16, 2021
phys.org
Several different causes of aging have been discovered, but the question remains whether there are common underlying mechanisms that determine aging and lifespan. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing and the CECAD Cluster of Excellence in Ageing research at the University Cologne have now come across folate metabolism in their search for such basic mechanisms. Its regulation underlies many known aging signaling pathways and leads to longevity. This may provide a new possibility to broadly improve human health during aging.
Science X staff
June 15, 2021
phys.org
The biological and historical diversity in museum collections is staggering, with specimens collected across centuries by some of the most famous scientists in history. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen successfully revived museal fungal specimens that were more than 250 years old and used the live cultures for whole genome sequencing and physiological experiments.
Science X staff
May 26, 2021
phys.org
Hundreds of antibiotic resistant genes found in the gastrointestinal tracts of Danish infants
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