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RNA

RNA

RNA stands for ribonucleic acid. Messenger RNA (mRNA) is copied or transcribed from DNA and carries the coding information for the generation of a protein encoded by a gene. Different types of non-coding RNAs have roles in converting mRNA into protein and perform other regulatory functions in the cell.

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Beth Mole
October 1, 2021
Ars Technica
In Phase III trial, the drug smashed hospitalization and death rate by about half.
FinSMEs
October 1, 2021
FinSMEs
About | Advertise | Contact | Disclaimer | News | The Daily Deal Newsletter FinSMEs.com by FinSMEs is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
September 28, 2021
AP NEWS
PARIS (AP) -- French drugmaker Sanofi said Tuesday it was shelving plans for a COVID-19 vaccine based on messenger RNA despite positive results from early stage testing.The Paris-based company said it will continue to develop another vaccine candidate that is already undergoing late stage human trials.
Nick Paul
September 23, 2021
FierceBiotech
AstraZeneca is making a play for the red-hot RNA market. Rather than move directly onto turf fought over by the likes of BioNTech, Moderna and Sanofi, AstraZeneca has teamed up with a new British startup that has put a twist on the idea of using nucleic acids to trigger production of a molecule.
September 23, 2021
The Economic Times
VaxEquity, a startup founded by Imperial vaccinologist Robin Shattock, could receive up to $195 million if certain milestones are met, in addition to royalties on approved drugs and equity investment from AstraZeneca and life sciences investor Morningside Ventures.
Emmy Lucas
September 20, 2021
FierceBiotech
Jeffrey Stafford and his team of industry veterans have seen their biotechs go on to be acquired by the likes of Genentech, Bristol Myers Squibb and Celgene. Now, the collective is ready for its next venture: launching RNA biotech 858 Therapeutics with a $60 million series A fundraising.
Ben Adams
September 8, 2021
FierceBiotech
Eli Lilly is doubling down on RNA research as it pens another major biobucks pact with a small but promising biotech in the gene-silencing space.
Kyle LaHucik
September 7, 2021
FierceBiotech
Replicate Bioscience emerged from stealth with $40 million to bring four programs into the clinic. The biotech is using self-replicating RNA technology to go after cancer and immune disorders and plans to enter the clinic in the second half of 2022.
Science X staff
August 31, 2021
phys.org
In modern organisms, the hereditary material DNA encodes the instructions for the synthesis of proteins--the versatile nanomachines that enable modern cells to function and replicate. But how was this functional linkage between DNA and proteins established? According to the "RNA world" hypothesis, primordial living systems were based on self-replicating RNA molecules. Chemically speaking, RNA is closely related to DNA. However, in addition to storing information, RNA can fold into complex structures that have catalytic activity, similar to the protein nanomachines that catalyze chemical reactions in cells. These properties suggest that RNA molecules should be capable of catalyzing the replication of other RNA strands, and initiating self-sustaining evolutionary processes. Hence, RNA is of particular interest in the context of the origin of life as a promising candidate for the first functional biopolymer.
Dove Press
August 30, 2021
news.google.com
Evaluating the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety, storage temperature, dose units, vaccinal strategy, and alternative compounds for COVID-19 vaccines.
Diana Gitig
August 27, 2021
Ars Technica
As if an Android phone could all of a sudden run iOS at the same time.
Rashi Hardaha
August 27, 2021
news.google.com
The genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing Covid-19, can change shape and structure to boost its survival, say researchers noting that the finding can help produce more effective drugs to treat the infectious disease.
August 27, 2021
Ahmedabad Mirror
The genetic material of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing Covid-19, can change shape and structure to boost its survival, say researchers noting that the finding can help produce more effective drugs to treat the infectious disease. The study led by researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Bioinformatics Institute (BII), showed that the virus' ribonucleic acid (RNA) can fold into complex and dynamic shapes for its growth and survival when inside infected cells, the Strait Times reported. The team also discovered that the virus RNA can interact with a lot of the human cell's RNA to make use of it for its own survival. "Aside from understanding the shape that the virus takes when inside human cells, recent work has also shown that its shapes are also very important for drugs targeting the RNA, which was what prompted us to start this project," Dr Wan Yue, group leader of the Laboratory of RNA Genomics and Structure was quoted as saying. The findings were published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. While a lot of research has gone into how antibodies interact with the virus proteins and its genome, little is known about how the virus interacts with human RNA once it infects a cell. In the new study, the team learnt that the virus binds with a small nucleolar RNA, or snoRNA, to steal its modification abilities. This helps to stabilise the virus, making it more successful in infecting the host cells. The snoRNA modifies the body's translation machinery to enable the body to produce protein properly. The findings can help to inform other researchers on the regions in the virus RNA that can be targeted for drug development, Yue said. The team had also compared the structures of the original, or wild-type SARS-CoV-2 virus, with a variant, and found that the latter has a region of its RNA deleted. They also found shape differences between the wild type and the variant, the researchers said.
Science X staff
August 27, 2021
phys.org
Researchers from the group of Stan Brouns (Delft University of Technology) have discovered a new CRISPR-Cas system that cuts RNA. The study will be published on August 26 in Science and is expected to offer many opportunities for the development of new applications in genetic research and biotechnology.
IANS
August 27, 2021
News18
The study led by researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Bioinformatics Institute (BII), showed that the virus' ribonucleic acid (RNA) can fold into complex and dynamic shapes for its growth and survival when inside infected cells, the Strait Times reported.
Science X staff
August 25, 2021
phys.org
Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a method to engineer new functionalities into cells. The results were published today in the journal Cell in the article "Dual film-like organelles enable spatial separation of orthogonal eukaryotic translation."
Science X staff
August 25, 2021
phys.org
Researchers from Western Sydney University have joined the global race to better understand COVID-19, with new research proposing how a SARS-CoV-2 protein (Nsp9), vital in the virus' life cycle, is supporting the replicating process.
Pall Thordarson
August 25, 2021
phys.org
The mRNA vaccine success story is one of the few positives to emerge from COVID-19. But these vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech are only the tip of the iceberg in the coming RNA medical technology revolution.
Nicholas Kirkwood
August 20, 2021
phys.org
As Australia's national COVID-19 vaccine rollout continues and the threat of new and existing global variants looms, rapid testing remains essential for identification, contact tracing and containment of infection.
Shi En Kim
August 17, 2021
Smithsonian Magazine
While a promising route to boosting crop yields, experts say more work needs to be done to understand why the tweak works
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