RNA

RNA

RNA stands for ribonucleic acid. Messenger RNA (mRNA) is copied or transcribed from DNA and carries the coding information for the generation of a protein encoded by a gene. Different types of non-coding RNAs have roles in converting mRNA into protein and perform other regulatory functions in the cell.

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V. Geetanath
November 27, 2020
The Hindu
CSIR-CCMB's simpler and cost effective method can ramp up testing.
Science X staff
November 27, 2020
phys.org
A team led by LMU's Veit Hornung has shown that a protein found in skin cells recognizes a specific nucleic acid intermediate that is formed during virus replication. This recognition process subsequently induces a potent inflammatory response.
November 26, 2020
clinicaltrials.gov
Effect of Favipiravir on Mortality in Patients With COVID-19 at a Tertiary Center Intensive Care Unit - Full Text View.
Emily Caldwell
November 26, 2020
phys.org
New research has identified and described a cellular process that, despite what textbooks say, has remained elusive to scientists until now--precisely how the copying of genetic material that, once started, is properly turned off.
BioSpace
November 25, 2020
BioSpace
Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ARWR) today announced that the collaboration and license agreement between Arrowhead and Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited announced on October 8, 2020, has now closed
November 24, 2020
BioSpace
Alnylam Announces U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approval of OXLUMOTM (lumasiran), the First and Only Treatment Approved for Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 to Lower Urinary Oxalate Levels in Pediatric and Adult Patients - read this article along with other careers information, tips and advice on BioSpace
November 24, 2020
BioSpace
Alnylam Announces Innovative Value-Based Agreement Framework for OXLUMOTM (lumasiran) to Accelerate Access for Patients with Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 and Deliver Ultra-Rare Orphan Disease Pricing Solutions to U.S. Payers - read this article along with other careers information, tips and advice on BioSpace
Science X staff
November 23, 2020
phys.org
The synthesis and self-organization of biological macromolecules is essential for life on earth. Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich chemists now report the spontaneous emergence of complex ring-shaped macromolecules with low degrees of symmetry in the laboratory.
Science X staff
November 23, 2020
phys.org
Protocell compartments used as models for an important step in the early evolution of life on Earth can be made from short polymers. The short polymers, which better approximate the likely size of molecules available on the early Earth, form the compartments through liquid-liquid phase separation in the same manner as longer polymers. Although they have no membrane separating them from their environment, the protocells can sequester RNA and maintain distinct internal microenvironments, in some ways even outperforming similar compartments made from longer polymers.
Beth Newcomb
November 20, 2020
phys.org
Two recent USC studies in tiny worms could offer insights on how genetics and diet affect reproduction and lifespan in many other species, including humans.
November 19, 2020
BioSpace
Alnylam Receives Approval for OXLUMOTM (lumasiran) in the European Union for the Treatment of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 in All Age Groups - read this article along with other careers information, tips and advice on BioSpace
Science X staff
November 18, 2020
phys.org
Scientists have discovered how a common virus in the human gut infects and takes over bacterial cells--a finding that could be used to control the composition of the gut microbiome, which is important for human health.
Arthur Allen
November 18, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Morgan Sherburne
November 17, 2020
phys.org
Deep inside your cells, DNA provides the instructions to produce proteins, the essential molecules that grow and maintain your body.
IANS
November 17, 2020
@bsindia
mRNA (messenger RNA) vaccines trick the body into producing some of the viral proteins itself
BioSpace
November 17, 2020
BioSpace
Evotec SE announced that, as part of its ongoing collaboration with STORM Therapeutics, the leading biotechnology company focused on the discovery and development of small molecule therapies modulating RNA epigenetics, STORM has selected STC-15 as a first-in-class development candidate.
Ewen Callaway
November 16, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Lisbeth Heilesen
November 16, 2020
phys.org
In a screening for a functional impact to the neuronal differentiation process, Danish researchers identified a specific circular RNA, circZNF827, which surprisingly "taps the brake" on neurogenesis. The results provide an interesting example of co-evolution of a circRNA, and its host-encoded protein product, that regulate each other's function, to directly impact the fundamental process of neurogenesis.
DNA Web Team
November 13, 2020
DNA India
Worrying discovery about Coronavirus nucleotides found - The supposed covering quality is named ORF3d and has been concealed inside the structure of nucleotides, the structure squares of DNA and RNA, in the coronavirus for months, undetected up to this point.
Science X staff
November 13, 2020
phys.org
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University have developed an advanced technique to monitor a virus infection live. The researchers from the groups of Marvin Tanenbaum and Frank van Kuppeveld expect that the technique can be used to study a wide variety of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2--the virus responsible for the current pandemic. The technique named VIRIM (virus infection real-time imaging) is therefore very valuable for gaining insights in virus infection in the human body. Eventually, this could lead to more targeted treatments for viral infection. The results were published in the scientific journal Cell on the 13th of November.
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