Oregon

Oregon

State of the United States of America

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By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press
February 28, 2020
Houston Chronicle
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - A long-awaited federal report due Friday is expected to address the feasibility of removing four hydroelectric dams on a major Pacific Northwest river in a last-ditch effort to save more than a dozen species of threatened or endangered salmon. The four dams on the lower Snake River in eastern Washington are part of a vast and complex hydroelectric power system operated by the federal government in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana. The 14 federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers together produce 40% of the region's power - enough electricity to power nearly 5 million homes, or eight cities roughly the size of Seattle. They also contain a system of locks that allows cities nearly 500 miles (800 kilometers) inland from the Pacific Ocean access to Asian markets via barges that float down the massive rivers to the sea. At the same time, the towering dams have proven disastrous for salmon that struggle to navigate past them on human-made fish ladders as they swim upstream to spawn and die after spending most of their lives in the Pacific Ocean. Salmon are unique in that they hatch in freshwater streams and then make their way hundreds of miles to the ocean, where they spend years before finding their way back to their natal streams to mate, lay eggs and die. Snake River sockeye were the first species in the Columbia River Basin listed under the Endangered Species Act in 1991. Now, 13 salmon runs are listed as federally endangered or threatened. Scientists also warn that southern resident orcas are starving to death because of a dearth of the chinook salmon that are their primary food source. The Puget Sound population of orcas - also called killer whales - was placed on the endangered species list in 2005. A mother orca that carried her dead baby on her back for 17 days brought...
Parker Hall, Adrienne So
February 21, 2020
Wired
From snowboard bindings to the best balaclava we've ever tested, here is our favorite ski and snowboard equipment.
Nina Lakhani
February 11, 2020
the Guardian
The Pacific lamprey - a jawless fish that looks like an eel - is considered a 'first food' by the Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla tribes, as it was a key element of their ancestors' diet. Photograph: Fredlyfish4/Wikimedia Commons
James Rogers
February 3, 2020
Fox News
A mysterious 19th-century "ghost wagon" has appeared in an Oregon lake.
Julia Musto
January 26, 2020
Fox News
Local law enforcement is investigating the theft of nearly 100 beehives -- each reportedly holding more than 50,000 bees -- from an orchard in northern California.
Jon Brodkin
January 23, 2020
Ars Technica
ISPs fell short of interim deadlines, leaving Americans without service.
Melissa Breyer
December 26, 2019
TreeHugger
Our photo of the day comes from the Cascade Mountains of Oregon.
By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press
December 26, 2019
Houston Chronicle
WARRENTON, Ore. (AP) - A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the U.S. West Coast. After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen - those who use nets to catch rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch and other deep-dwelling fish - are making a comeback here, reinventing themselves as a sustainable industry less than two decades after authorities closed huge stretches of the Pacific Ocean because of the species' depletion. The ban devastated fishermen, but on Jan. 1, regulators will reopen an area roughly three times the size of Rhode Island off Oregon and California to groundfish bottom trawling - all with the approval of environmental groups that were once the industry's biggest foes. The rapid turnaround is made even more unique by the collaboration between the fishermen and environmentalists who spent years refining a long-term fishing plan that will continue to resuscitate the groundfish industry while permanently protecting thousands of square miles of reefs and coral beds that benefit the overfished species. Now, the fishermen who see their livelihood returning must solve another piece of the puzzle: drumming up consumer demand for fish that haven't been in grocery stores or on menus for a generation. "It's really a conservation home run," said Shems Jud, regional director for the Environmental Defense Fund's ocean program. "The recovery is decades ahead of schedule. It's the biggest environmental story that no one knows about." The process also netted a win for conservationists concerned about the future of extreme deepwater habitats where bottom trawlers currently don't go. A tract of ocean the size of New Mexico with waters up to 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers) deep will be off-limits to bottom-trawling to protect deep-sea corals and sponges just now...
Susan Crawford
December 16, 2019
Wired
From Portland to Plano, local governments are placing different limits on the use of biometric data. That's a good thing.
Sean Keach
December 10, 2019
Fox News
Explorers and scientists are on the trail of legendary 'creature' Bigfoot in the forests of Oregon.
Michael Hiltzik
December 9, 2019
Los Angeles Times
Experts at Stanford and the IRS found that the Obamacare mandate got people to buy insurance, and the insurance reduced death rates
Michelle Mark
December 3, 2019
Business Insider
The idea has sparked condemnation from civil-rights advocates who have raised concerns about racial profiling.
By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press
November 23, 2019
Houston Chronicle
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - The carcass of a giant blue whale that has been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about as long as two school buses, washed ashore near Gold Beach, Oregon, in 2015. It's exceptionally rare to see an intact blue whale carcass wash ashore. The only other documented case happened more than 200 years ago, said Bruce Mate, emeritus director of Oregon State University's Marine Mammal Institute. That's when the Lewis and Clark expedition traded with a local tribe for blubber in 1806 when what is believed to be a blue whale washed ashore near modern-day Cannon Beach, Oregon. Blue whales are the largest animals that have ever lived on Earth, even bigger than the largest dinosaurs, Mate said. "We have blue whales offshore every year, but they are typically a deep-water animal, farther offshore - 10 miles or more," he said. "When they do die, the usually sink to the bottom rather than wash up on the beach." Seeing an opportunity, scientists removed 58 tons of flesh from the 2015 carcass and then placed the bones in the water off Newport, Oregon, so underwater scavengers could pick them clean. The bones were placed in huge nets and submerged with weights in Yaquina Bay with the help of a technical dive team from the Oregon Coast Aquarium. All 365 of those bones were brought back to land Thursday, including 18-foot-long (5.5-meter-long) mandibles and a skull weighing 6,500 pounds (2,900 kilograms), according to a statement from the university. The bones will be transported to a nearby warehouse, and the university is asking for local volunteers who can...
The Associated Press
November 23, 2019
CTVNews
The carcass of a giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday.
Aria Bendix
November 15, 2019
Business Insider
States like California and Hawaii have the worst homelessness crises and some of the highest housing costs in the US.
November 14, 2019
WebWire
In 2017, Buzzfeed author and illustrator Adam Ellis captured the image of a ghost child in his New York City apartment and wrote his first of many spine-tingling tweets: "My apartment is currently being haunted by the ghost of a dead child and he's trying to kill me." In a state of fear and confusion, he documented his haunting on social media under the hashtag #DearDavid. Fourteen million people feverishly followed his terrifying experience, yearning for answers behind the little boy who...
Associated Press
October 24, 2019
the Guardian
A purple urchin at Bodega Marine Lab in California, which is running a pilot project to remove purple urchins from the ocean floor, restore them to health, then sell them as premium seafood. Photograph: Terry Chea/AP
The Associated Press
October 24, 2019
CTVNews
Tens of millions of voracious purple sea urchins that have already chomped their way through towering underwater kelp forests in California are spreading north to Oregon, sending the delicate marine ecosystem off the shore into such disarray that other critical species are starving to death.
By GILLIAN FLACCUS and TERENCE CHEA, Associated Press
October 24, 2019
Houston Chronicle
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) - Tens of millions of voracious purple sea urchins that have already chomped their way through towering underwater kelp forests in California are spreading north to Oregon, sending the delicate marine ecosystem off the shore into such disarray that other critical species are starving to death. A recent count found 350 million purple sea urchins on one Oregon reef alone - a more than 10,000% increase since 2014. And in Northern California, 90% of the giant bull kelp forests have been devoured by the urchins, perhaps never to return. Vast "urchin barrens" - stretches of denuded seafloor dotted with nothing but hundreds of the spiny orbs - have spread to coastal Oregon, where kelp forests were once so thick it was impossible to navigate some areas by boat. The underwater annihilation is killing off important fisheries for red abalone and red sea urchins and creating such havoc that scientists in California are partnering with a private business to collect the over-abundant purple urchins and "ranch" them in a controlled environment for ultimate sale to a global seafood market. "We're in uncharted territory," said Scott Groth, a shellfish scientist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. "You can't just go out and smash them. There's too many. I don't know what we can do." The explosion of purple sea urchins is the latest symptom of a Pacific Northwest marine ecosystem that's out of whack. Kelp has been struggling because of warmer-than-usual waters in the Pacific Ocean. And, in 2013, a mysterious disease began wiping out tens of millions of starfish, including a species called the sunflower sea star that is the only real predator of the ultra-hardy purple urchin. Around the same time, the purple urchins had two excellent breeding...
Melissa Breyer
October 22, 2019
TreeHugger
Our photo of the day comes from the Algonquin Highlands, Ontario.
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