Neuralink

Neuralink

Nanobiotechnology company founded in 2016 by Elon Musk and Max Hodak developing brain-machine interface to connect humans and computers based in San Francisco, California. Neuralink develops devices aimed to help people with brain diseases and injuries, with a long term vision of developing devices that merge humans with AI.

All edits by  Meredith Hanel 

Edits on 30 Oct, 2019
Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 30 Oct, 2019
Edits made to:
Infobox (+1 properties)
People (+1 rows) (+2 cells) (+17 characters)
People

Name
Role
LinkedIn

Jared Birchall

CEO

Infobox
CEO
Jared Birchall
Edits on 22 Jul, 2019
Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+9 characters)
Article

By feeding electrical stimulation back to the brain cortex, Neuralink also plans to provide the perception of visual stimulation to a blind person or touch feedback to help someone operate a prosthetic device. The idea is similar to how cochlear implants use an external device to convert sound to electrical stimulation of nerve fibers along the cochlea.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+879/-263 characters)
Article

A potential use of Neuralink's devices would be to allow people with paralysis to control computers with their thoughts. The Neuralink mentioned in their July 17, 2019 presentation that a monkey implanted with their device was able to control a computer with its brain. InAs well as decoding movement intentions in the presentationmotor Eloncortex, Muskwhich could allow a paralysed person to control avatars or assisted robotic devices, Neuralink also stated the long term goal of achieving symbiosis with artificial intelligence. A challenge acknowledged by Neuralink is to achievethat longevitytheir oftechnology thecould devicesbe andused to prevent potential safety issues duedecode tospeech theintentions breakdownwhich ofalso deviceoriginate in the harsh environment inside themotor braincortex.

By feeding electrical stimulation back to the brain cortex, Neuralink also plans to provide the perception of visual stimulation to a blind person or touch to help someone operate a prosthetic device. The idea is similar to how cochlear implants use an external device to convert sound to electrical stimulation of nerve fibers along the cochlea.

In the presentation Elon Musk stated the long term goal of achieving symbiosis with artificial intelligence. A challenge acknowledged by Neuralink is to achieve longevity of the devices and to prevent potential safety issues due to the breakdown of device in the harsh environment inside the brain.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+194 characters)
Article

Neuralink's first BCI product designed for humans, called the "N1 Sensor" is planned to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and successfully implanted into a human patient by the end of 2020 in a clinical study. According to Hodak Neuralink would attempt to pursue an early feasibility study under an investigational device exemption.

...

Neurolink’s 2019 non-peer reviewed whitepaper demonstrates two of their devices System A and System B implanted in rats which took electrophysiological recordings as they moved around freely. Digitized broadband signals were processed in real-time to identify action potentials, also referred to as spikes, using an online detection algorithm. Neurolink uses custom spike-detection software for filter out false positive spikes. Their threshold was set to >0.35 Hz to quantify the number of electrodes recording spiking units. The simultaneous recording from over 3000 inserted electrodes in a freely moving rat was reported. The placement of electrodes was successful 87% of the time in 19 rats. Neuralink did not demonstrate capabilities for modulating neural activity, but state that their device is designed to be capable of electrical stimulation on every channel.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+609 characters)
Article

Neuralink’s devices build upon academic research in deep brain stimulation, cochlear implants, neurostimulation for epilepsy and the Utah array. The Utah Array, used for neural recording in BCI research and the BrainGate device, is made of a rigid grid of up to 128 electrode channels. Depending on the version, Neuralink claims its systems can record from 1,500 or 3000 electrode channels. The thin, flexible electrodes are claimed to be less likely to cause tissue damage compared with the Utah Array which is known to cause a tissue response that can interfere with recorded signals or damage brain cells.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+56 characters)
Article

Neuralink's President Max Hodak graduated from Duke in 2012 with a degree in biomedical engineering. Hodak previously started companies MyFit and Transcriptic. Hanson and Sabes along with Michel Maharbiz at UC Berkeley developed a device dubbed the "sewing machine" that uses a stiff needle to drive flexible electrodes into the brain. Vanessa Tolosa is Neuralink's microfabrication expert.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Timeline (+15/-29 characters)
Article (+18 characters)
Article

Neurolink’s 2019 non-peer reviewed whitepaper demonstrates two of their devices System A and System B implanted in rats which took electrophysiological recordings as they moved around freely. Digitized broadband signals were processed in real-time to identify action potentials, also referred to as spikes, using an online detection algorithm. Neurolink uses custom spike-detection software for filter out false positive spikes. Their threshold was set to >0.35 Hz to quantify the number of electrodes recording spiking units. The simultaneous recording from over 3000 inserted electrodes in a freely moving rat was reported. Neuralink did not demonstrate capabilities for modulating neural activity, but state that their device is designed to be capable of electrical stimulation on every channel.

Timeline

July 16, 2019

Elon Musk and the team at Neuralink livestream their companies product launch event for theirthe N1 Sensor.

July 16, 2019

A white paper authored by Elon Musk and Neuralink was released by the company with details regarding their past experiments and the progress of theirthe companiescompany's technological development.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Timeline (+1 events) (+201 characters)
Article (+36/-20 characters)
Article

Neuralink's President Max Hodak graduated from Duke in 2012 with a degree in biomedical engineering. Hodak previously started companies MyFit and Transcriptic. Hanson and Sabes along with Michel MahaarbizMaharbiz at UC Berkeley previously developed a device dubbed the "sewing machine" that uses a stiff needle to drive flexible electrodes into the brain.

Timeline

March 14, 2019

The "sewing machine" for minimally invasive neural recording

Timothy L Hanson, Camilo A Diaz-Botia, Viktor Kharazia, Michel M Maharbiz, Philip N Sabes

A version of the surgical robot used by Neuralink.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 22 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
People (+1 rows) (+2 cells) (+34 characters)
People

Name
Role
Related Golden topics

Matthew McDougall

Head Neurosurgeon

Edits on 20 Jul, 2019
Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+327/-315 characters)
Article

The company is making a neural lace with the ability to recognize and interact with the electrical and chemical signals passing through the nervous system within neurons. Their devices detect the electrical field produced by nerve action potentials and record the information represented by a neuron. The brain is then represented by the firing statistics of action potentials. Neural recordings can be decoded and turned into electrical signals fed back to the nervous system or into robotic devices. Neuralink's N1 Sensor is designed to "record from and selectively stimulate as many neurons as possible across diverse brain areas", and has three publicly stated goals for its neural lace technology:

Neural recordings can be turned into electrical signals fed back to the nervous system or into robotic devices. Neuralink's N1 Sensor is designed to "record from and selectively stimulate as many neurons as possible across diverse brain areas", and has three publicly stated goals for its neural lace technology:

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+315/-195 characters)
Article

The company is making a neural lace with the ability to recognize and interact with the electrical and chemical signals passing through the nervous system within neurons. Their devices detect the electrical field produced by nerve action potentials and record the information represented by a neuron. The brain is then represented by the firing statistics of action potentials. Their N1 Sensor is designed to "record from and selectively stimulate as many neurons as possible across diverse brain areas", and has three publicly stated goals for its neural lace technology:

Neural recordings can be turned into electrical signals fed back to the nervous system or into robotic devices. Neuralink's N1 Sensor is designed to "record from and selectively stimulate as many neurons as possible across diverse brain areas", and has three publicly stated goals for its neural lace technology:

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+6/-6 characters)
Article

Neuralink’s device being developed is presented as a research platform for use in rodents and a prototype towards a fully implantable human BMIBCI in the 2019 white paper in bioRxiv. The system uses a wired connection to maximize the bandwidth for raw data streaming for research and development. Clinical devices that will be derived from the platform are planned to be fully implantable, have on-board signal compression, reduced power consumption, wireless power transmission and data telemetry through the skin without percutaneous leads.

...

Neuralink's first BMIBCI product designed for humans, called the "N1 Sensor" is planned to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and successfully implanted into a human patient by the end of 2020 in a clinical study.

Meredith Hanel"Elon Musk has used the term neural lace in a more loose way, but this specific device is not a neural lace by the more specific definition where it is an injected electronic mesh that spreads into brain tissues "
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+24/-134 characters)
Article

The company is developing a neural lace that spreads into brain tissues and allows the computer to directly connect to it. Neuralink's first neural laceBMI product designed for humans, called the "N1 Sensor" is planned to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and successfully implanted into a human patient by the end of 2020 in a clinical study.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (-3 characters)
Article

The first clinical study will focus on patients with quadriplegia due to C1-C4 spinal cord injury and will use a four-chip setup to enable patients to control their smartphone using their brain. One of the N1 sensors would be implanted in the somatosensory cortex and the other three placed in the motor cortex. Each sensor is has more than a thousand electrodes. Through that they will be able to control a computer mouse and keyboard by using a Bluetooth connection. Musk stated in 2017 that it may be around 8-10 years before the device is available for people without disabilities.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+320/-133 characters)
Article

Neuralink is a nanobiotechnology company developing implantable brain-computer interface (BCI) to connect humans and computers that is headquartered in San Francisco, California and was founded in 2016 by Elon Musk, Max Hodak, Tim Hanson, Tim Gardner, Vanessa Tolosa, Ben Rapoport, Paul Merolla, Dongjin Seo, and Phillip Sabes.

Neuralink's President Max Hodak graduated from Duke in 2012 with a degree in biomedical engineering. Hodak previously started companies MyFit and Transcriptic. Hanson and Sabes along with Michel Mahaarbiz at UC Berkeley previously developed a device that uses a stiff needle to drive flexible electrodes into the brain.

...

Neurolink’s President Max Hodak credited a 2003 paper in PLOS One written by a team led by Miguel A.L. Nicolelis at Duke University, the first to show macaque monkeys using their brains to make robotic arms reach and grasp, as laying the foundation on which their work builds. Hodak previously did research in the Nicolelis lab at Duke. Hodak graduated from Duke in 2012 with a degree in biomedical engineering. Hodak previously started companies MyFit and Transcriptic.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+134 characters)
Article

Neurolink’s President Max Hodak credited a 2003 paper in PLOS One written by a team led by Miguel A.L. Nicolelis at Duke University, the first to show macaque monkeys using their brains to make robotic arms reach and grasp, as laying the foundation on which their work builds. Hodak previously did research in the Nicolelis lab at Duke. Hodak graduated from Duke in 2012 with a degree in biomedical engineering. Hodak previously started companies MyFit and Transcriptic.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+27/-11 characters)
Article

Supin Chen and Vanessa M. Tolosa of Neuralink is anare authorauthors on a Journal of Neural Engineering paper describing the design and fabrication of silicon insertion shuttles for faster, easier and less damaging implantation of polymer arrays into the brain.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+169 characters)
Article

The first clinical study will focus on patients with quadriplegia due to C1-C4 spinal cord injury and will use a four-chip setup to enable patients to control their smartphone using their brain. One of the N1 sensors would be implanted in the somatosensory cortex and the other three placed in the motor cortex. Each sensor is has more than a thousand electrodes. Through that they will be able to control a computer mouse and keyboard by using a Bluetooth connection. Musk stated in 2017 that it may be around 8-10 years before the device is available for people without disabilities.

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 20 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+336 characters)
People (+11 characters)
Article

Neurolink’s President Max Hodak credited a 2003 paper in PLOS One written by a team led by Miguel A.L. Nicolelis at Duke University, the first to show macaque monkeys using their brains to make robotic arms reach and grasp, as laying the foundation on which their work builds. Hodak previously did research in the Nicolelis lab at Duke.

People

Name
Role
Related Golden topics

Max Hodak

Co-founder, President

Meredith Hanel
Meredith Hanel edited on 19 Jul, 2019
Edits made to:
Article (+417 characters)
Article

The first clinical study will focus on patients with quadriplegia due to C1-C4 spinal cord injury and will use a four-chip setup to enable patients to control their smartphone using their brain. Through that they will be able to control a computer mouse and keyboard by using a Bluetooth connection. Musk stated in 2017 that it may be around 8-10 years before the device is available for people without disabilities.

Golden logo
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0; additional terms apply. By using this site, you agree to our Terms & Conditions.