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Insomnia

Insomnia

Inability to sleep

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June 14, 2021
The New Indian Express
Representative image (Pic: Express) A 15-year longitudinal study shows that childhood insomnia symptoms that persist into adulthood are strong determinants of mood and anxiety disorders in young adults. Results show that insomnia symptoms persisting from childhood through adolescence and into adulthood were associated with a 2.8-fold increased risk of internalising disorders. The findings of the study were published in the journal Sleep. Insomnia symptoms that newly developed over the course of the study were associated with a 1.9-fold increased risk of internalizing disorders. No increased risk of internalising disorders was found for those children in whom insomnia symptoms remitted during the study period. "We found that about 40 per cent of children do not outgrow their insomnia symptoms in the transition to adolescence and are at risk of developing mental health disorders later on during early adulthood," said lead author Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, who has a doctorate in psychobiology and is an associate professor at Penn State College of Medicine. He is a psychologist board certified in behavioural sleep medicine at Penn State Health Sleep Research and Treatment Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Data were analysed from the Penn State Child Cohort, a population-based sample of 700 children with a median age of 9 years. The researchers had followed up 8 years later with 421 participants when they were adolescents (median age of 16 years) and now 15 years later with 492 of them when they were young adults (median age of 24 years). Insomnia symptoms were defined as moderate-to-severe difficulties initiating or maintaining sleep. The symptoms were parent-reported in childhood and self-reported in adolescence and young adulthood. The presence of internalising disorders was defined as a self-report of a diagnosis or treatment for mood and/or anxiety disorders. Results were adjusted for sex, race/ethnicity, age, and any prior history of internalising disorders or use of medications for mental health problems. According to the authors, childhood insomnia symptoms have been shown to be associated with internalising disorders, which include depressive disorders and anxiety disorders. "These new findings further indicate that early sleep interventions are warranted to prevent future mental health problems, as children whose insomnia symptoms improved over time were not at increased risk of having a mood or anxiety disorder as young adults," said Fernandez-Mendoza. .tags-bottom span{color: #000000;font-size: 20px;padding-top: 13px; } .tags-bottom a{padding: 10px 15px;border-bottom:none;border: 2px solid #eee;border-radius: 26px;background: #f4981d;color:#fff;} TAGS Mental Health Insomnia Anxiety
Anita Singh
October 7, 2019
The Telegraph
Insomnia and other mental health conditions should be treated "with the same seriousness as cancer", according to Tom Bradby, the ITV broadcaster.
Frederic Lardinois
October 2, 2019
TechCrunch
API and microservices platform Kong today announced that it has acquired Insomnia, a popular open-source tool for debugging APIs. The company, which also recently announced that it had raised a $43 million Series C round, has already put this acquisition to work by using it to build Kong Studio, a tool for designing, building and [...]
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