White House

White House

Official residence and workplace of the president of the united states

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Emily Holden in Washington and agencies
September 12, 2020
the Guardian
Nancy Pelosi has been notably tepid on green legislation - so are the Democrats serious about fighting climate change?
By DARLENE SUPERVILLE, Associated Press
September 7, 2020
Houston Chronicle
WASHINGTON (AP) - The prospect of a vaccine to shield Americans from coronavirus infection emerged Monday as a point of contention in the White House race as President Donald Trump accused Democrats of "disparaging" for political gain a vaccine he repeatedly has said could be available before the election. "It's so dangerous for our country, what they say, but the vaccine will be very safe and very effective," the president pledged at a White House news conference. Trump leveled the accusation a day after Sen. Kamala Harris, the Democrats' vice presidential candidate, said she "would not trust his word" on getting the vaccine. "I would trust the word of public health experts and scientists, but not Donald Trump," Harris said. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden amplified Harris' comments Monday after he was asked if he would get a vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Biden said he would take a vaccine but wants to see what the scientists have to say, too. Biden said Trump has said "so many things that aren't true, I'm worried if we do have a really good vaccine, people are going to be reluctant to take it. So he's undermining public confidence." Still, the former vice president said: "If I could get a vaccine tomorrow I'd do it, if it would cost me the election I'd do it. We need a vaccine and we need it now." The back-and-forth over a coronavirus vaccine played out as three of the candidates fanned out across the country on Labor Day, the traditional start of the two-month sprint to the election. Harris and Vice President Mike Pence campaigned in Wisconsin and Biden went to Pennsylvania. Trump added the news conference to a schedule that originally was blank. Harris, a California Democrat, said in a...
By DARLENE SUPERVILLE, Associated Press
September 8, 2020
Houston Chronicle
WASHINGTON (AP) - The prospect of a vaccine to shield Americans from coronavirus infection emerged as a point of contention in the White House race as President Donald Trump accused Democrats of "disparaging" for political gain a vaccine he repeatedly has said could be available before the election. "It's so dangerous for our country, what they say, but the vaccine will be very safe and very effective," the president pledged Monday at a White House news conference. Trump leveled the accusation a day after Sen. Kamala Harris, the Democrats' vice presidential candidate, said she "would not trust his word" on getting the vaccine. "I would trust the word of public health experts and scientists, but not Donald Trump," Harris said. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden amplified Harris' comments Monday after he was asked if he would get a vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Biden said he would take a vaccine but wants to see what the scientists have to say, too. Biden said Trump has said "so many things that aren't true, I'm worried if we do have a really good vaccine, people are going to be reluctant to take it. So he's undermining public confidence." Still, the former vice president said: "If I could get a vaccine tomorrow I'd do it, if it would cost me the election I'd do it. We need a vaccine and we need it now." The back-and-forth over a coronavirus vaccine played out as three of the candidates fanned out across the country on Labor Day, the traditional start of the two-month sprint to the election. Harris and Vice President Mike Pence campaigned in Wisconsin and Biden went to Pennsylvania. Trump added the news conference to a schedule that originally was blank. Harris, a California Democrat, said in a...
By MATTHEW PERRONE, AP Health Writer
September 7, 2020
Houston Chronicle
WASHINGTON (AP) - At the height of the coronavirus lockdown, President Donald Trump and his top health advisers trumpeted a new test that would help Americans reclaim their lives - one that would tell them if they already had the virus and were protected from getting it again. Their arrival would help "get Americans back to work" by showing those who might have "the wonderful, beautiful immunity," said Trump, a point repeated at the daily briefings last April. Months later, the U.S. is awash in the tests but the bold predictions about their usefulness have yet to materialize. "There was definitely a lot of wishful thinking that there was going to be a magical test that was going to save us all, but we're not there yet," said Dr. Jennifer Rakeman of New York City's Public Health Laboratory. The tests check the blood for antibodies the body makes to fight off an infection. Scientists are still working to figure out how well antibodies for the coronavirus may shield someone from another infection, or how long that protection might last. Some early studies suggested any immunity fades fast; research published last week was more promising, suggesting that antibodies last at least four months after diagnosis and do not fade quickly. For now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Medical Association explicitly warn that antibody tests should not be used to make decisions about returning workers to the office or students to school, though some labs still promote them for those uses. The CDC recommends everyone - even those who were sick and recovered - take precautions to prevent getting and spreading the virus. Experts say it was probably unrealistic to expect answers to key immunity questions early in the outbreak. Those questions have traditionally been answered only...
The Associated Press
September 3, 2020
CTVNews
The U.S. federal budget deficit is projected to hit a record US$3.3 trillion as huge government expenditures to fight the coronavirus and to prop up the economy have added more than $2 trillion to the federal ledger, the Congressional Budget Office said.
Agencies
September 2, 2020
@bsindia
Biden may lead the polls but lose the Electoral College, say analysts
Associated Press
September 2, 2020
Boston Herald
The Trump administration is canceling some of its remaining orders for ventilators, after rushing to sign nearly $3 billion in emergency contracts as the COVID-19 pandemic surged in the spring.
Associated Press
September 1, 2020
Boston Herald
The Trump administration has issued a directive halting the eviction of certain renters though the end of 2020 to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.
Martin Farrer
September 2, 2020
the Guardian
Health workers protest in Mexico City about the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Photograph: Carlos Tischler/REX/Shutterstock
AP | PTI
August 30, 2020
@bsindia
President Donald Trump said National Intelligence Director John Ratcliffe made the decision because the administration got tired of intelligence about election security leaking from Congress
AP
August 30, 2020
@bsindia
Public health experts expressed concern Friday about President Donald Trumps largely mask-free, socially un-distanced Republican convention event on the White House lawn
AP
August 30, 2020
@bsindia
I worry about these individuals infecting one another and most certainly going back to their home, said Wen, who previously served as Baltimores health commissioner
AP
August 29, 2020
@bsindia
Sowing fear about the implications of a Joe Biden victory to battleground state voters, Trump held a rally in New Hampshire on Friday evening
Beth Mole
August 28, 2020
Ars Technica
The political appointment of a right-wing activist at the FDA alarmed agency staff.
Danny Boyle
August 28, 2020
The Telegraph
Plus, Shinzo Abe 'set to resign', home working warning & Alexa has hundreds of regional words added
Rozina Sabur
August 28, 2020
The Telegraph
Speaking at the Republican National Convention Ivanka Trump says her father is 'the defender of common sense'
AP
August 28, 2020
@bsindia
No one appeared concerned about social distancing. Few wore masks. Some told reporters they had not been tested for the coronavirus
Press Trust of India
August 28, 2020
@bsindia
Trump told his fellow Americans that at no time before have voters faced a clearer choice between two parties, two visions, two philosophies or two agendas
Our Foreign Staff
August 28, 2020
The Telegraph
Hundreds of protesters have gathered in Washington as unrest has erupted again over police brutality towards black Americans
AP
August 27, 2020
@bsindia
US health officials have sparked criticism and confusion after posting guidelines on coronavirus testing from the White House task force that run counter to what scientists say
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