RedWorks Construction Technologies

RedWorks Construction Technologies

A construction technology company that has created a portable machine which can produce various types of masonry for construction projects. It is located in Lancaster, California and was founded in 2017.

All edits by  Jessica Karpinski 

Edits on 29 Apr, 2019
Jessica Karpinski
Jessica Karpinski edited on 29 Apr, 2019
Edits made to:
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RedWorks Construction Technologies

Company

A construction technology company that has created a portable machine which can produce various types of masonry for construction projects. It is located in Lancaster, California and was founded in 2017.

Article

RedWorksTM has been busy, moving into new facilities, securing our first customer, and building and testing our Beta Printer for early users, civilian and military. Right now our priority is brining ISAC to market, and to that end we've been carrying out a battery of tests on the Multi-Core Induction Extruder (M-CIE) at the heart of our machine. Part of that process has included testing a wider range of materials as feedstock; our earlier proof of concept tests used ordinary play sand, as its properties were well known and made a good control material. Now we're testing everything we can get our hands on, from pre-sifted fine grain riverbed sand to the dirt pulled out of our own backyards, complete with a healthy mix of sticks and pebbles. Each of the above samples were run under the same conditions, and each test produced samples of stone, regardless of how moist or dry the material may be, in spite of the presence of large chunks of rock and pebbles mixed in, or even if there's a mix of multiple materials. If it's pulled out of the ground, M-CIE can turn it into rock.

RedWorksTM is a construction technology company that is developing a portable factory so that materials necessary for building and construction can be made from anywhere.

Product

The company's main product is called In-Sito Addictive Construction (ISAC). There is a Multi-Core Induction Extruder (M-CIE) at the center of the machine. This part of the machine can turn any kind of dirt, sand, or dust into rock, which can then be used for construction of a building. ISAC uses 3D printing technology to make masonry, such as brick or concrete.

...

What our latest round of tests mean for the future of construction cannot be understated: Instead of shipping concrete or bricks to a site, or building an expensive concrete plant near-site, you can make all the masonry you'd need to build as much material of any design you want completely on-site. The entire process consumes significantly less energy than your average concrete plant of brick kiln, but more important to the contractor, this means material made with ISAC is a lot cheaper than what they can get from a distributor. Your average brick on store shelves today costs about 50 cents, but in California where the average energy cost is 12 cents/kilowatt hour, RedWorks' P-Series printers could make bricks costing as little as 1 cent per unit. 1/50th the cost for traditional masonry materials, and that's just for general purpose bricks. Imagine being able to make cinderblocks, tilt-up walls, even decorative facings all for a tiny fraction of what they cost now, without having to move anything to the site. Moreover, the fact that ISAC doesn’t have to move anything to site to make masonry is a game changer, and solves some key pain points of the construction industry, particularly for working on job sites that are a little out of the way. Developers often have to mix or make concrete on-site with either cement trucks or "portable" concrete plants. Both of these solutions are expensive, loud, and dirty, and not exactly a good way to get the neighbors on a developer’s side. ISAC solves this problem by offering a portable manufacturing system that can be delivered to site on the back of a pickup, while using whatever dirt can be found on site without any major pre-processing on the part of the builder. That's why it's so important that our machine is able to use any material we can find, it frees up builders to take advantage of remote areas rather than be constrained by them, placing fewer issues on neighboring communities and the customer while delivering projects to completion at a lower cost.

Instead of shipping concrete or bricks to a site, or building an expensive concrete plant near-site, customers can make all the masonry they need on-site. The company's stated intention for the product is to free up builders to take advantage of remote areas, placing fewer issues on neighboring communities and the customer while delivering projects to completion at a lower cost.

...

ISAC will offer builders the means to make better materials with delays, no waste, and at a cost lower than any comparable form of masonry. This is a material agnostic system. That means you don’t need to do a lot of prep work to make material, just start dumping dirt into the machine and make whatever you need in the field. Our team is still working to bring this technology to market, but the progress we've made thus far shows just how great an impact our technology can have on industry, changing the face of construction one block at a time.

Further reading

Title
Author
Link
Type

RedWorks Wants To Build Your First Home On Mars

Elizabeth Segran

Web

Infobox
Location
Lancaster, California
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