Personal Financial Management

Personal finance management (PFM) refers to software that assists users with money management.

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Edits on 15 Dec, 2020
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In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, GeezeoGeezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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Article

In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include MenigaMeniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner edited on 15 Dec, 2020
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Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro BankMetro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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In 1997, Microsoft partnered with Intuit and CheckFreeCheckFree to developed Open Financial Exchange (OFX), a program that allowed financial institutions to participate in data-exchanges with web users. This served as a conduit for the development of online PFM software. In 1999, the company Yodlee was founded as a website that allowed users to view email, banking, news, travel, and shopping information all in one place. However, Yodlee shifted to focus exclusively on online banking practices to allow users to view information from all of their financial accounts at once.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MXMX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
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Personal finance management became an industry in 1983, following Scott Cook and Tom Proulx's founding of Intuit. The company was developed during the rise of the personal computer. The pair saw an opportunity to develop personal financial software, which came to be known as Quicken, the company's flagship product. After Quicken became successful, the company launched a second software called QuickBooks for small businesses and financial managementfinancial management.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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Personal finance management became an industry in 1983, following Scott Cook and Tom ProulxTom Proulx's founding of Intuit. The company was developed during the rise of the personal computer. The pair saw an opportunity to develop personal financial software, which came to be known as Quicken, the company's flagship product. After Quicken became successful, the company launched a second software called QuickBooks for small businesses and financial management.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital InsightDigital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+6/-6 characters)
Article

In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks TandemTandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
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Article

In 1997, Microsoft partnered with Intuit and CheckFree to developed Open Financial Exchange (OFX), a program that allowed financial institutionsfinancial institutions to participate in data-exchanges with web users. This served as a conduit for the development of online PFM software. In 1999, the company Yodlee was founded as a website that allowed users to view email, banking, news, travel, and shopping information all in one place. However, Yodlee shifted to focus exclusively on online banking practices to allow users to view information from all of their financial accounts at once.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+5/-5 characters)
Article

In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like MovenMoven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+10/-10 characters)
Article

Personal finance management became an industry in 1983, following Scott CookScott Cook and Tom Proulx's founding of Intuit. The company was developed during the rise of the personal computer. The pair saw an opportunity to develop personal financial software, which came to be known as Quicken, the company's flagship product. After Quicken became successful, the company launched a second software called QuickBooks for small businesses and financial management.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+9/-9 characters)
Article

Around the same time, another company called MECA software released a similar product for PFM called Managing-Your-Money (MYM). It was the idea of MECA software president Gerald Rubin and developed by Andrew Tobias. The software initially ran on the Apple-II and was later adapted for the IBM-PC. In 1990, MicrosoftMicrosoft also released a PFM software called Microsoft Money.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+10/-10 characters)
Article

Personal finance management became an industry in 1983, following Scott Cook and Tom Proulx's founding of Intuit. The company was developed during the rise of the personal computer. The pair saw an opportunity to develop personal financial software, which came to be known as Quicken, the company's flagship product. After Quicken became successful, the company launched a second software called QuickBooksQuickBooks for small businesses and financial management.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+6/-6 characters)
Article

In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and SimpleSimple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+9/-9 characters)
Article

In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners Wesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThorMoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+7/-7 characters)
Article

Personal finance management became an industry in 1983, following Scott Cook and Tom Proulx's founding of Intuit. The company was developed during the rise of the personal computer. The pair saw an opportunity to develop personal financial software, which came to be known as QuickenQuicken, the company's flagship product. After Quicken became successful, the company launched a second software called QuickBooks for small businesses and financial management.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+6/-6 characters)
Article

In 1997, Microsoft partnered with Intuit and CheckFree to developed Open Financial Exchange (OFX), a program that allowed financial institutions to participate in data-exchanges with web users. This served as a conduit for the development of online PFM software. In 1999, the company YodleeYodlee was founded as a website that allowed users to view email, banking, news, travel, and shopping information all in one place. However, Yodlee shifted to focus exclusively on online banking practices to allow users to view information from all of their financial accounts at once.

Erin Scherfner
Erin Scherfner approved a suggestion from Golden's AI on 15 Dec, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+6/-6 characters)
Article

In 2006, a wave of PFM providers surfaced, including industry front runners WesabeWesabe and Mint. In 2009, Mint was acquired by Intuit for $170M, and in 2010, Wesabe closed due to Mint's ability to automatically aggregate user accounts and transactions, causing Wesabe to lose market traction. In 2008, the PFM industry expanded in scope, with financial advisory companies like LearnVest, CreditKarma, and Personal Capital integrating PFM into their software. Direct banks, like Moven and Simple, did the same. Many PFM companies began to focus on selling software directly to financial institutions; these companies include Meniga, Digital Insight, Geezeo, MX, and Strands, who help banks deliver finance management to small businesses. In 2015, the industry was again disrupted with the uprising of artificial intelligence (AI) by companies like MoneyThor and Personetics. Various large global banks, such as the Royal Bank of Canada and the UK challenger banks Tandem and Metro Bank, use the AI integrations to provide data-backed insights and other convenience features like customer service chatbots.

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