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Neuralink

Neuralink

Nanobiotechnology company founded in 2016 by Elon Musk and Max Hodak developing brain-machine interface to connect humans and computers based in San Francisco, California. Neuralink develops devices aimed to help people with brain diseases and injuries, with a long term vision of developing devices that merge humans with AI.

All edits by  Grant Gasser 

Edits on 5 Oct, 2020
Grant Gasser"Fix minor spelling and grammatical errors"
Grant Gasser edited on 5 Oct, 2020
Edits made to:
Article (+22/-33 characters)
Article

Elon Musk prefers to use the term "neural lace" for the BCI's in development by Neuralink. A term he took from a a series of science fiction books written by the Scottish novelist Iain M. Banks called The Culture.

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Neuralink’s devices build upon academic research in deep brain stimulation, cochlear implants, neurostimulation for epilepsy and the Utah array. The Utah Array, used for neural recording in BCI research and the BrainGate device, is made of a rigid grid of up to 128 electrode channels. Depending on the version, Neuralink claims its systems can record from 1,500 or 3000 electrode channels. The thin, flexible electrodes are claimed to be less likely to cause tissue damage compared withthan the Utah Array which is known to cause a tissue response that can interfere with recorded signals or damage brain cells.

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In 2015, Mosehni and Nudo were having trouble raising money to continue their work and were approached by a buyer, who's identity was unknown to them at the time, wanting to purchase the trademark rights for their company's name, NeuroLink. The two founders sold the company name to the mysterious buyer for tens of thousands of dollars (the actual amount is unknown). It was not until after the deal was made that Mohseni and Nudo learned that the mysterious buyer was actually Elon Musk. Musk decided to change the name of the company slightly from NeuroLinkNeuraLink to NeurolinkNeuralink before officially founding the company in 2016.

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