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Muscular fibrosis

Muscular fibrosis

Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset genetically inherited disease of skeletal muscles associated with progressive blepharoptosis (ptosis) and dysphagia.

Fibrosis following Acute Skeletal Muscle Injury: Mitigation and Reversal Potential in the Clinic
Abstract

Skeletal muscle injuries occur often in athletics and in daily life. In minor injuries, muscles are able to regenerate completely and recover their functional capabilities. However, in the case of severe injuries, the injured muscle cannot recover to a functional level because of the formation of fibrous scar tissue. The physical barrier of scars is significantly challenged in both research and clinical treatment. Fibrous scar tissue not only limits cells’ migration, but also contributes to normal tissue biomechanical properties. This scar formation creates an unsuitable environment for tissue structure resulting in frequent pain. Antifibrosis treatment is one of the major strategies used to augment muscle regeneration and accelerate its functional recovery. This review will discuss the currently available methods for improving muscle regeneration with a specific focus on antifibrosis applications. We also discussed several novel hypotheses and clinical applications in muscle fibrosis treatment currently in practice.

1. Introduction

Skeletal muscle injuries are common injuries experienced by athletes of all levels. Muscle strain is extremely common and usually occurs due to eccentric contractions and overstraining during activity. Particularly, sports that involve springing or jumping are commonly implicated in muscle strain injuries.Skeletal muscle does have the capability to heal itself; however, the process of healing can be incomplete and lead to a decrease in function and risk of repeat injury. Skeletal muscle injuries also often occur in the aged populations, leading to inconvenience in daily life. The slow healing of aged muscle is caused by both losing muscle mass, fibrosis, and systemic age .Skeletal muscle is one of the largest tissues by mass in the human body, making up 40–45% of total body weight. 

The primary function is the production of motion and support of the bony skeleton. In order to do so, skeletal muscles are made up of multiple basic structures. Myofibers are the basic component within muscles. It contains the various of muscle cells (e.g., myoblasts and progenitor cells) and fiber typical cytoplasm and organelles. Myofibers are formed when multiple muscle progenitor cells (muscle satellite cells or muscle stem cells—MuSCs) fuse to form myotubes. In this process, they resemble long cylinders. The myotubes mature to form myofibers, which is noticeable when the nuclei move from, its central location to a peripheral, subsarcolemmal location. Myofibers contain multiple nuclei due to the syncytial nature. Multiple layers of connective tissue are associated with skeletal muscle.

Myofibers are formed when multiple muscle progenitor cells (muscle satellite cells or muscle stem cells—MuSCs) fuse to form myotubes. In this process, they resemble long cylinders. The myotubes mature to form myofibers, which is noticeable when the nuclei move from its central location to a peripheral, subsarcolemmal location. Myofibers contain multiple nuclei due to the syncytial nature.

Timeline

February 16, 2022
Creative Commons -- Attribution 4.0 International -- CC BY 4.0
May 2002
MUSCLE INJURIES AND REPAIR

Further Resources

Title
Author
Link
Type
Date

Duchenne & Becker muscular dystrophy - causes, symptoms, treatment & pathology

Web

August 11, 2016

Fibrosis following Acute Skeletal Muscle Injury: Mitigation and Reversal Potential in the Clinic

Tyler Gardner, Keith Kenter, Yong Li

Journal

September 1, 2020

Fibrosis following Acute Skeletal Muscle Injury: Mitigation and Reversal Potential in the Clinic

Tyler Gardner, Keith Kenter, Yong Li

Journal

September 1, 2020

Fibrosis following Acute Skeletal Muscle Injury: Mitigation and Reversal Potential in the Clinic

Tyler Gardner, Keith Kenter, Yong Li

Journal

September 1, 2020

References

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