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Lyme disease

Lyme disease

Human disease

Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is a vector-borne disease caused by the Borrelia bacterium, which is spread by ticks in the genus Ixodes. The most common sign of infection is an expanding red rash, known as erythema migrans, which appears at the site of the tick bite about a week afterwards. The rash is typically neither itchy nor painful. Approximately 70–80% of infected people develop a rash. Early diagnosis can be difficult. Other early symptoms may include fever, head aches and tiredness. If untreated, symptoms may include loss of the ability to move one or both sides of the face, joint pains, severe headaches with neck stiffness or heart palpitations. Months to years later repeated episodes of joint pain and swelling may occur. Occasionally shooting pains or tingling in the arms and legs may develop. Despite appropriate treatment about 10 to 20% of those affected develop joint pains, memory problems and tiredness for at least six months.

Timeline

Further Resources

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News

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Center for Lyme Action
March 4, 2021
www.prnewswire.com:443
/PRNewswire/ -- The Center for Lyme Action, the leading nonprofit dedicated to growing federal funding for Lyme disease, honored Members of Congress, current...
April 16, 2020
WebWire
Researchers using a new test for Lyme disease have uncovered multiple bacterial species in California and Mexico according to a report published in the prestigious medical journal Healthcare (Basel) ( https://www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/8/2/97 )., , , , The report entitled "Lyme Disease: Diversity of Borrelia Species in California and Mexico Detected Using a Novel Immunoblot Assay" was authored by nurse practitioner Melissa Fesler and internist Raphael Stricker from Union Square Medical Associ...
February 19, 2019
WebWire
Advocates for Lyme disease patients are calling on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to withdraw its endorsement of single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of Lyme disease after a tick bite. A key limitation of the recommendation is that it is based on a single study that has not been replicated and which did not prove that the prophylaxis actually prevented Lyme disease. In addition, the recommendation is restrictive since it is only recommended if cer
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