Golden
KoBold Metals

KoBold Metals

A mining company that utilizes Big data, statistical modeling, and ore-deposit science to research natural resources exploration. It was founded in 2018 and is located in Berkeley, California. 

KoBold Metals is a Berkeley-based company that is using various sources to explore ways to find natural resources, specifically cobalt. The resource is widely used in lithium-ion batteries, which can be used for mobile phones and electric cars. The company expects for there to be an increase in demand for the resource as there is a global shift towards using alternative forms of energy.

Product

The company is using artificial intelligence, geochemical, geophysical, and geological data in order to create technology that can locate cobalt. The product uses machine learning algorithms and is meant to act as a search engine for finding the resource. KoBold Metals has used its technology and has purchased land in North America based on the predictions given by the product. 

Investors

There have been several investors in the company. Venture capital firms Breakthrough Energy and Andreessen Horowitz have invested in KoBold Metals. Other investors include Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, and Michael Bloomberg. 



Timeline

Funding rounds

1 Result
Funding round
Funding round
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Funding round amount (USD)
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Investment
Investment

People

Name
Role
LinkedIn

Jeff Jurinak, Ph.D.

COO



Josh Goldman, Ph.D.

CFO and CTO



Kurt House, Ph.D.

CEO



Further reading

Title
Author
Link
Type
Date

Renewables MMI: Startup Backed by Billionaires Aims to Find New Cobalt Sources - Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner

Fouad Egbaria

Web

March 13, 2019

Documentaries, videos and podcasts

Title
Date
Link

a16z Podcast: The Search for the Secret Metal that Powers All Our Devices

July 24, 2019

Companies

Company
CEO
Location
Products/Services









References