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Jamón

Jamón

Most jamón is commonly called jamón serrano in Spain.

Jamón (Spanish pronunciation: [xaˈmon], pl. jamones) is a kind of dry-cured ham produced in Spain. It is one of the most globally recognized food items of Spanish cuisine (along with others such as gazpacho and paella). It is also regularly a component of tapas.

Most jamón is commonly called jamón serrano in Spain.

Jamón is the Spanish word for ham. As such, other ham products produced or consumed in Spanish-speaking countries may also be called by this name.

Jamón is typically consumed in slices, either manually carved from a leg on a jamonero stand using a sharp thin slicing knife, or cut from the deboned meat with a rotatory cold-cut slicer. It's also regularly consumed in any shape in small portions.

As a product, Jamón is similar to Portuguese presunto and to Italian prosciutto, but the production differs by a longer curing phase (up to 18 months), giving it a dryer texture, deeper color and stronger flavour than the former.

A whole Jamón leg is considerably cheaper by weight than its sliced counterpart because it includes the bone and non-edible fat. Once the external fat layers are removed and the meat is exposed, though, the product must be consumed as soon as possible since a progressive drying and deteriorating process starts. This is not an issue for restaurateurs and retailers, since they go through product much faster than an individual. Home users will typically choose sliced product, be it freshly cut from a deli stand, commercially pre-packaged or vacuum preserved. Jamón is safe to consume for as long as is kept in its leg in a dry and cool environment and direct sunlight is avoided, but it must be kept refrigerated once cut away from the leg.

Jamón may also be smoked in some regions and it is consumed, mostly for personal use. This is common in the southern area of Castile and León as well as parts of Extremadura. Such a jamón has a harder texture and smoky-salty flavour.

Though widely available (even if on the expensive side) in Spain and accessible in some of the European Union, import duties and trade or food safety restrictions that apply to foreign meat products[9] in international markets may raise substantially the prices while creating a scarcity, often making jamón a prohibitively costly product to import and offer overseas.

Timeline

Further Resources

Title
Author
Link
Type
Date

Jamón - Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

Web

Jamón - Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

Web

Jamón al horno | #VickyRecetaFacil

Web

December 6, 2016

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