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Human Proteome Folding Project

Human Proteome Folding Project

The Human Proteome Folding project aims to provide scientists with data that predicts the shape of a very large number of human proteins so that they can understand the element that carries out the functions which keeps humans alive.

The Human Proteome Folding Project utilizes genetic sequencing to analyze the proteins within it. Understanding the function of proteins can aid researchers with medical progress and finding cures for diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, SARS, and malaria. Medical professionals can also use the knowledge of proteins to give diagnoses to patients which are specific to them in the present moment, rather than utilizing patient data such as age, weight, sex, etc. to create predictions. 



Project

Researchers are using the World Community Grid for computational power to analyze proteins due to the high volume that need to be analyzed. The grid combines the power of multiple computers so that information can be found and shared faster than with using just one computer. The computers are capable of testing out different ways to fold the protein chains in the same way the human body does. This technology uses machine learning to recognize protein folds, which can give insights into the function of the protein, such as predictions into RNA-binding ability.



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Further reading

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Structural genomics: keystone for a Human Proteome Project

Gaetano T. Montelione & Stephen Anderson





The Proteome Folding Project: proteome-scale prediction of structure and function

K. Drew et al.





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