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Glen Dettman

Glen Dettman

Glen Dettman (November 1921 – 11 October 1993) was an Australian pathologist and medical writer who, in 1950, founded the Oakleigh Pathology Service. He was the author of over 50 technical papers, 28 of which are listed on PubMed, and was awarded in 1978 the Australian Medal of Merit for outstanding scientific research.

Glen Dettman (November 1921 – 11 October 1993) was an Australian pathologist and medical writer who, in 1950, founded the Oakleigh Pathology Service. He was the author of over 50 technical papers, 28 of which are listed on PubMed, and was awarded in 1978 the Australian Medal of Merit for outstanding scientific research.

Education and career

After earning his B.A. and PhD at the Independent University of Australia, in 1936 Dettman started his career as a laboratory technician trainee at the University of Melbourne's Veterinary Research Institute. Dettman joined the Australian Army Medical Corp on 17 Jan 1944, and was discharged a year later on 26 Jan 1945 as Staff Sergeant, where he assisted with the original organisation of a blood bank and was involved with the initial use of penicillin. Dettman later served as a commissioned officer for the Australian army, where he tutored upon army health, with particular emphasis on the value of immunizations. At the time, he was a technical officer with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), and his research activities included such fields as antibiotics, bovine mastitis, and staphylococcal studies, which yielded a modified staphylococcal vaccine.

In 1950, Dettman founded the Oakleigh Pathology Service and was later elected as a Registered Pathology Practitioner. The Australasian College of Biomedical Science in 1969, appointed Dettman to head a research team to investigate the claims of Archie Kalokerinos in relation to immunization hazards and the efficacy of vitamin C. Kalokerinos' claims were that many infants were dying as the result of vitamin C deficiencies and that these deaths could be prevented by the injection of the vitamin.

According to Kalokerinos, the vitamin C deficiencies could result from infections, gut disturbances including parasitic infestation and other immune insults including vaccination. Dettman's research substantiated Kalolerinos' claim that most of the children were vitamin C deficient, becoming a witness to the dramatic effect that injections of Vitamin C had in saving the lives of many young infants. Dettman's observations had such an impact, he became a firm believer in vitamin C and joined forces with Kalokerinos in promoting the benefits of vitamin C.

Dettman was married to Nancy and fathered three children, Ian, Clive, and Robin.

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