DeepMind

DeepMind

DeepMind is an artificial intelligence company creating programs that use deep neural networks to teach themselves how to play a variety of games like Go and chess.

DeepMind is an artificial intelligence company creating programs that use deep neural networks to teach themselves how to play a variety of games like Go and chess. The company was founded on September 23, 2010, by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg, and Mustafa Suleyman and was acquired by Google in 2014.

Timeline

2014
DeepMind becomes a subsidiary of Google.

Funding rounds

Funding round
Funding type
Funding round amount (USD)
Funding round date
Investment
DeepMind Series A round, January 2011
January 1, 2011
1 Result
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Products

Product
Description
Launch date
Website
Industry
AlphaFold

Developed by DeepMind, AlphaFold is an artificial intelligence system for protein folding and developing 3D models of proteins.

1 Result
Results per page:
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People

Name
Role
LinkedIn

Demis Hassabis

Co-Founder, CEO

Mustafa Suleyman

Co-Founder, Head of Applied AI

Shane Legg

Co-Founder, Chief Scientist

Further reading

Title
Author
Link
Type
Date

DeepMind Control Suite

Yuval Tassa, Yotam Doron, Alistair Muldal, Tom Erez, Yazhe Li, Diego de Las Casas, David Budden, Abbas Abdolmaleki, Josh Merel, Andrew Lefrancq, Timothy Lillicrap, Martin Riedmiller

Academic paper

DeepMind Lab

Charles Beattie, Joel Z. Leibo, Denis Teplyashin, Tom Ward, Marcus Wainwright, Heinrich Küttler, Andrew Lefrancq, Simon Green, Víctor Valdés, Amir Sadik, Julian Schrittwieser, Keith Anderson, Sarah York, Max Cant, Adam Cain, Adrian Bolton, Stephen Gaffney, Helen King, Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg, Stig Petersen

Academic paper

Google achieves AI 'breakthrough' by beating Go champion

Machine Theory of Mind

Neil C. Rabinowitz, Frank Perbet, H. Francis Song, Chiyuan Zhang S,. M. Ali Eslami, Matthew Botvinick

Academic paper

Documentaries, videos and podcasts

Title
Date
Link

Companies

Company
CEO
Location
Products/Services

News

Title
Author
Date
Publisher
Description
John Timmer
December 24, 2020
Ars Technica
MuZero handles both rules-based and open-ended games.
Devin Coldewey
December 23, 2020
TechCrunch
DeepMind has made it a mission to show that not only can an AI truly become proficient at a game, it can do so without even being told the rules. Its newest AI agent, called MuZero, accomplishes this not just with visually simple games with complex strategies, like Go, Chess, and Shogi, but with visually [...]
By Leo Kelion
December 23, 2020
BBC News
The successor to AlphaGo is being used to create a more efficient type of video compression.
Will Knight
December 23, 2020
Wired
David Silver of DeepMind, who helped create the program that defeated a Go champion, thinks rewards are central to how machines--and humans--acquire knowledge.
Guardian Staff
December 20, 2020
the Guardian
The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft approaching the International Space Station for a docking, 17 November. Photograph: Nasa/Zuma Wire/Rex/Shutterstock
Guardian Staff
December 20, 2020
the Guardian
The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft approaching the International Space Station for a docking, 17 November. Photograph: Nasa/Zuma Wire/Rex/Shutterstock
Martin Coulter
December 17, 2020
Business Insider
The move underscores Google's commitment to DeepMind, with shows little sign of turning a profit any time soon.
Editorial
December 6, 2020
the Guardian
Editorial: This is an achievement that answers one big scientific question but raises more fundamental ones for society
BBC News
December 2, 2020
BBC News
The discovery is expected to advance medical research in treating disease.
Martin Coulter
December 2, 2020
Business Insider
One professor at the University of California branded DeepMind's announcement 'laughable'.
Ewen Callaway
December 1, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
December 1, 2020
The Indian Express
Google's artificial intelligence unit took a giant step to predict the structure of proteins, potentially decoding a problem that has been described as akin to mapping the genome
John Timmer
November 30, 2020
Ars Technica
Google's AI specialists tackle biology's toughest computational problem.
Conor Hale
November 30, 2020
FierceBiotech
Researchers at DeepMind, Google's artificial intelligence-focused sibling, believe they've now cracked the code, with a computer model that can translate a chain of amino acids into a 3D structure.
Will Heaven
November 30, 2020
MIT Technology Review
AlphaFold can predict the shape of proteins to within the width of an atom. The breakthrough will help scientists design drugs and understand disease.
Michael Le Page
November 30, 2020
New Scientist
AI firm DeepMind's latest creation, AlphaFold, can predict the shape of proteins from their sequence alone. This fiendish problem normally requires time-consuming experiments, but is key to understanding the machinery of life
Amy Thomson | Bloomberg
November 30, 2020
@bsindia
DeepMind Technologies Ltd.s AlphaFold reached the threshold for solving the problem at the latest Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction competition
Chris Velazco
November 30, 2020
Engadget
Alphabet-owned DeepMind may be best known for building the AI that beat a world-class Go player, but the company announced another, perhaps more vital breakthrough this morning. As part of its work for the 14th Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction, or CASP, DeepMind's AlphaFold 2 AI has shown it can guess how certain proteins will fold themselves with surprising accuracy. In some cases, the results were perceived to be "competitive" with actual, experimental data.
Science X staff
November 30, 2020
phys.org
In a major scientific advance, the latest version of DeepMind's AI system AlphaFold has been recognized as a solution to the 50-year-old grand challenge of protein structure prediction, often referred to as the 'protein folding problem', according to a rigorous independent assessment. This breakthrough could significantly accelerate biological research over the long term, unlocking new possibilities in disease understanding and drug discovery among other fields.
By Helen Briggs
November 30, 2020
BBC News
The advance is expected to accelerate research into a host of human diseases, including Covid-19.
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References

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