Cellular agriculture

Cellular agriculture

Cellular agriculture is an interdisciplinary scientific field drawing from several disciplines such as synthetic biology, genetic engineering, molecular biology, tissue engineering, biochemistry, and food science to design organisms capable of producing a wide variety of agricultural products.

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Jason D. Rowley
Jason D. Rowley edited on 15 Oct, 2020
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Kristopher Gasteratos
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Edits on 26 Jul, 2019
Tracy Conley
Tracy Conley edited on 26 Jul, 2019
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There is no need for the use of pesticides and herbicides to make animal products using cellular agriculture. Less pesticide and herbicide use made possible by cellular agriculture will help to reduce ocean eutrophication due to excessive amounts of nutritionistnutrients flowing into the worlds oceans through agricultural run off, and play a significant toleroll in the restoration of the oceanic dead zones (low oxygen areas) back to productive marine ecosystems.

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Dawson Sewell
Dawson Sewell edited on 5 Jul, 2019
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AsideThere fromis energyno need for the use of pesticides and use requiresherbicides to producemake animal products using cellular agriculture, there is also no need for the use of pesticides and herbicides. Less pesticide and herbicide use made possible by cellular agriculture will help to reduce ocean eutrophication due to excessive amounts of nutritionist flowing into the worlds oceans through agricultural run off, and play a significant tole in the restoration oceanic dead zones (low oxygen areas) back to productive marine ecosystems.

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Golden AI
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Golden AI edited on 22 Jan, 2019
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Edits on 14 Nov, 2018
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Cellular Agriculture Society
Cellular Agriculture Society edited on 21 Oct, 2018
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Cellular Agriculture SocietyCellular Agriculture Society

Kristopher Gasteratos

San Francisco, CA

Non-profit

Cellular Agriculture Society"Update made on behalf of CAS."
Cellular Agriculture Society edited on 21 Oct, 2018
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Cellular Agriculture Society

Kristopher Gasteratos

San Francisco, CA

Non-profit

Cellular Agriculture Society
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Cellular Agriculture 101

Cellular Agriculture Society

Web article

Cellular Agriculture Society

Cellular Agriculture Society

Web article

Cellular Agriculture Society"Updates made on behalf of CAS."
Cellular Agriculture Society edited on 21 Oct, 2018
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Cellular Agriculture 101

Cellular Agriculture Society

www.cellag.info

Web article

Cellular Agriculture Society

Cellular Agriculture Society

www.cellag.org

Web article

History & the Neomnivore

Kristopher Gasteratos

Web

Edits on 20 Sep, 2018
Jude Gomila
Jude Gomila edited on 20 Sep, 2018
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First animal tissue recoredrecorded to survive outside of the animal organism

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Carla Faraguna
Carla Faraguna edited on 7 Aug, 2018
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Uma Valeti

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Michael Mangus
Michael Mangus edited on 17 Jul, 2018
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According to Dr. Mark Post of Maastricht University, who created the first cultured beef burger in 2013, it takes 440,000 cows to produce 1,750,000 burgers; the same amount of burgers could be cultured from the cells of one cow using cellular agriculture techniques. Proponents of cellular agriculture highlight this potential for reduction in animal suffering as compared to traditional livestock practices. Erin Kim, communication director of New HarvestNew Harvest, believes "There is simply no more room left to pack more animals onto land, or meat onto the breast of a boiler chicken".

Edits on 27 Jun, 2018
Alex Dean
Alex Dean edited on 27 Jun, 2018
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Cellular agriculture is an interdisciplinary scientific field drawing from several disciplines such as synthetic biology, genetic engineering, molecular biology, tissue engineering, biochemistry and food science to design organisms capable of producing a wide variety of agricultural products. Cellular agricultures primary focus is designing organisms capable of building relevant proteins, fats, and other tissues for the production of animal products. For example, animal products made through cellular agriculture include: beef, poultry, fish, dairy, egg, collagen, and gelatin. There are two categories of cellular agricultural products: cellular and acellular. Cellular products are made from whole cells — living or dead — and include products like beef, poultry and fish. Acellular products are made from products that are made by cells and do not include any living or once living cells. Examples of acellular products include: omega-3 fatty acids, gellatingelatin, casein, and ovalbumin. Cellular agriculture is a technology that provides opportunities to improve upon trade-offs of traditional agricultural practices and methods for meat production such as animal welfare, environmental impact, and nutritional value.

Edits on 20 Jun, 2018
Dawson Sewell
Dawson Sewell edited on 20 Jun, 2018
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Title
Date
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How Will Cellular Agriculture Be Regulated? with Vince Sewalt | New Harvest 2017

December 14, 2017

Edits on 19 Jun, 2018
Dawson Sewell
Dawson Sewell edited on 19 Jun, 2018
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Cellular agriculture is an interdisciplinary scientific field drawing from several disciplines such as synthetic biology, genetic engineering, molecular biology, tissue engineering, biochemistry and food science to design organisms capable of producing a wide variety of agricultural products. Cellular agricultures primary focus is designing organisms capable of building relevant proteins, fats, and other tissues for the production of animal productsanimal products. For example, animal products made through cellular agriculture include: beef, poultry, fish, dairy, egg, collagen, and gelatin. There are two categories of cellular agricultural products: cellular and acellular. Cellular products are made from whole cells — living or dead — and include products like beef, poultry and fish. Acellular products are made from products that are made by cells and do not include any living or once living cells. Examples of acellular products include: omega-3 fatty acids, gellatin, casein, and ovalbumin. Cellular agriculture is a technology that provides opportunities to improve upon trade-offs of traditional agricultural practices and methods for meat production such as animal welfare, environmental impact, and nutritional value.

Dawson Sewell
Dawson Sewell edited on 19 Jun, 2018
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According to a study published in the Environmental Science and technology journal analyzing the environmental impact of cultured meat compared to traditional livestock meat production, cultured meat has a significantly lower environmental impact. The 2011 study shows how cultured meat can improve upon traditional European livestock agriculture by reducing energy consumption by 7-45%, using 99% less land, 82-96% less water, and reducing greenhouse gasgreenhouse gas emissions by up to 78-96%.

Edits on 14 Jun, 2018
Dawson Sewell
Dawson Sewell edited on 14 Jun, 2018
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Further reading (+11 cells) (+125 characters)
Further reading

Author
Title
Link
Type

Agathe Foussat and Pauline Canteneur

Cellular agriculture: a way to feed tomorrow’s Smart City? - L'Atelier BNP Paribas

Web article

Erin Kim

A Closer Look at Cellular Agriculture and the Processes Defining It - AgFunderNews

Web article

futurefood.org

Future Food - In Vitro Meat

Web article

Hilary Hanson

'World's First' Lab-Grown Meatball Looks Pretty Damn Tasty

Web article

Jeff Bercovici

Why This Cardiologist Is Betting That His Lab-Grown Meat Startup Can Solve the Global Food Crisis

Web article

Lester Wan

Lab-made ‘foie gras’: Japan firm claims product could be commercially viable by 2021

Web article

New Harvest

Cellular Agriculture

Web article

Paul Shapiro

Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World

Book

Staff Reporter

World's first lab-grown burger eaten

Web article

United Nations

World Livestock 2011 - Livestock in food security

Academic paper

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