GoldenGolden
Advanced Search
Bonn

Bonn

City in Germany, former Capital

Help us improve this page by adding information.
Visit our Writing Guide or this topic page for additional help.

Timeline

People

Name
Role
LinkedIn

Further reading

Title
Author
Link
Type
Date

Documentaries, videos and podcasts

Title
Date
Link

Companies

Company
CEO
Location
Products/Services

News

Title
Author
Date
Publisher
Description
Ahmed Elgammal
September 27, 2021
HowStuffWorks
Famed composer Ludwig von Beethoven died leaving just a few notes for his 10th Symphony. More than 200 years later, scientists use artificial intelligence to finish the job.
Science X staff
August 27, 2021
phys.org
The importance of the root system for agricultural yields is often underestimated. Whether roots can access water and nutrients effectively also determines the resilience of important crops to drought and climate change. Researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Bologna (Italy) have discovered and described a mutant in barley: Its roots grow downwards much more sharply than usual. This discovery potentially provides a starting point for breeding more drought-resistant varieties. The study has now been published in PNAS.
Science X staff
August 25, 2021
phys.org
A new method developed at the University of Bonn simplifies ultra-precise adjustment for quantum optics experiments.
Science X staff
August 18, 2021
phys.org
An international study led by the University of Bonn has found evidence of a long-sought effect in accelerator data. The so-called "triangle singularity" describes how particles can change their identities by exchanging quarks, thereby mimicking a new particle. The mechanism also provides new insights into a mystery that has long puzzled particle physicists: Protons, neutrons and many other particles are much heavier than one would expect. This is due to peculiarities of the strong interaction that holds the quarks together. The triangle singularity could help to better understand these properties. The publication is now available in Physical Review Letters.
Science X staff
August 2, 2021
phys.org
When we fixate an object, its image does not appear at the place where photoreceptors are packed most densely. Instead, its position is shifted slightly nasally and upwards from the cellular peak. This is shown in a recent study conducted at the University of Bonn (Germany), published in the journal Current Biology. The researchers observed such offsets in both eyes of 20 healthy subjects, and speculate that the underlying fixation behavior improves overall vision.
Science X staff
August 2, 2021
phys.org
Which effects did the heat wave of summer 2020 have in Siberia? In a study led by the University of Bonn (Germany), geologists compared the spatial and temporal distribution of methane concentrations in the air of northern Siberia with geological maps. The result: the methane concentrations in the air after last year's heat wave indicate that increased gas emissions came from limestone formations. The study is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Science X staff
July 27, 2021
phys.org
Anyone who has ever failed to throw a beer mat into a hat should take note: physicists at the University of Bonn have discovered why this task is so difficult. However, their study also suggests how to significantly increase accuracy and range. The results are being publishing in the European Physical Journal Plus.
Science X staff
July 9, 2021
phys.org
People contribute only very little to climate protection, because they underestimate the willingness of others to contribute. This is the central result of a new study by the behavioral economists Peter Andre, Teodora Boneva, Felix Chopra and Armin Falk, members of the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne, published as an ECONtribute Discussion Paper.
Science X staff
June 29, 2021
phys.org
An international group of astronomers has created images with never-before-seen detail of a galaxy cluster with a black hole at its center, traveling at high speed along an intergalactic "road of matter." The findings also support existing theories of the origins and evolution of the universe.
Science X staff
June 16, 2021
phys.org
In the majority of insects, metamorphosis fosters completely different-looking larval and adult stages. For example, adult butterflies are completely different from their larval counterparts, termed caterpillars. This "decoupling" of life stages is thought to allow for adaptation to different environments. Researchers of the University of Bonn now falsified this text book knowledge of evolutionary theory for stoneflies. They found that the ecology of the larvae largely determines the morphology of the adults by investigating 219 earwig and stonefly species at high-resolution particle accelerators. The study has now been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
Science X staff
April 23, 2021
phys.org
Chemists of the University of Bonn developed a computational tool for the analysis of conformational entropies of flexible molecules. Their method enables the thermodynamic investigation of complicated chemical systems by combination of modern quantum chemical and classical models. In a successful attempt of simplifications, important contributions to the entropy can be calculated with minimal user intervention, even on standard desktop computers. The results are published in the journal Chemical Science and were highlighted as the "Pick of the Week" article.
Science X staff
April 8, 2021
phys.org
A current study by scientists of the University of Bonn and Southwest University in China sheds light on an unusual interdependence: Maize can attract special soil bacteria that, in turn, help the plants to grow better. In the long term, the results could be used to breed new varieties that use less fertilizer and therefore have less impact on the environment. The study is published in the prestigious journal Nature Plants.
Angus Liu
January 13, 2021
FierceBiotech
Scientists from the University of Bonn, the Karolinska Institutet and Scripps Research Institute have designed a COVID-19 treatment by fusing "nanobodies" from a llama and an alpaca. In lab experiments, the engineered antibodies were able to neutralize emerging mutants of the novel coronavirus.
Press Trust of India
January 13, 2021
@bsindia
Scientists have identified and further developed novel antibody fragments from llamas and alpacas that can be used against the SARS CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19.
Science X staff
December 24, 2020
phys.org
Paleontologists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have succeeded in reconstructing the chewing motion of an early mammal that lived almost 150 million years ago. This showed that its teeth worked extremely precisely and surprisingly efficiently. Yet it is possible that this very aspect turned out to be a disadvantage in the course of evolution. The study is published in the journal Scientific Reports.
Science X staff
December 22, 2020
phys.org
Chemists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have synthesized extremely unusual compounds. Their central building block is a silicon atom. Different from usual, however, is the arrangement of the four bonding partners of the atom, which are not in the form of a tetrahedron around it, but flat like a trapezoid. This arrangement is usually energetically extremely unfavorable, yet the molecules are very stable. Their properties are completely unknown so far; researchers now want to explore them. The results will be published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, but are already available online.
Martin Sander
November 6, 2020
phys.org
Long neck, small head and a live weight of several tons--with this description you could have tracked down the Plateosaurus in Central Europe about 220 million years ago. Paleontologists at the University of Bonn have now described for the first time an almost complete skeleton of a juvenile Plateosaurus and discovered that it looked very similar to its parents even at a young age. The fact that Plateosaurus showed a largely fully developed morphology at an early age could have important implications for how the young animals lived and moved around. The young Plateosaurus, nicknamed "Fabian," was discovered in 2015 at the Frick fossil site in Switzerland and is exhibited in the local dinosaur museum. The study was published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica.
May 11, 2020
WebWire
Superstar Robbie Williams is coming to Bonn for an exclusive concert. Due to the current developments around the coronavirus and the associated restrictions, the concert organizer, Robbie Williams, and all those involved have agreed that it will no longer be possible to allow the concert to take place this year. It has instead been rescheduled for June 13, 2021. The most successful solo artistic in the history of the UK album charts did not want to miss the chance to perform live in front...
Lee Billings
April 15, 2020
Scientific American
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
April 8, 2020
ANI News
Massachusetts [USA], April 8 (ANI): A new study using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton is challenging the basic notion of cosmology that says everything looks the same in all directions if you look over large enough distances.
SHOW MORE
Golden logo
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0; additional terms apply. By using this site, you agree to our Terms & Conditions.