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Block Withholding Attack

An attack in which a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks to the pool in an effort to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop.

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Edits on 21 Nov, 2019
Daniel Frumkin"Added to article to surpass 1000 characters"
Daniel Frumkin edited on 21 Nov, 2019
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A Block Withholding attack, also known as selfish mining, occurs when a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks they find to the pool. The intent of the attack is to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop. This type of attack, if sustained for a long enough period, can bankrupt a pay-per-share pool. Mitigation of a Block Withholding attack is complex because of the random nature of mining, but some methods have been developed such as various cryptographic commitment schemes combined with hash functions. These schemes typically prevent the pool administrator from cheating on the entire pool and make it impossible for miners in the pool to distinguish between a partial proof of work and complete proof of work.

One form of block withholding attack is operated when a miner finds a block in a victim pool and decides to avoid submitting immediately to the pool operator, and focuses all available mining power to the victim pool to increase the number of relative shares in the pool. After waiting, the blocker then releases the formerly found block. This is defended by using oblivious tasks so the miner is unable to determine between a full solution and a share.

Edits on 5 Dec, 2018
Dawson Sewell
Dawson Sewell edited on 5 Dec, 2018
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A Block Withholding attack, also known as selfish mining, occurs when a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks hethey findsfind to the pool. The intent of the attack is to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop. This type of attack, if sustained for a long enough period, can bankrupt a pay-per-share pool. Mitigation of a Block Withholding attack is complex because of the random nature of mining, but some methods have been developed such as various cryptographic commitment schemes combined with hash functions. These schemes typically prevent the pool administrator from cheating on the entire pool and make it impossible for miners in the pool to distinguish between a partial proof of work and complete proof of work.

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Related Topics
Edits on 7 Aug, 2018
Golden AI"Linkify text links in standard tables"
Golden AI edited on 7 Aug, 2018
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Further reading

Author
Title
Link
Type

Meni Rosenfeld

Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining RewardSystems

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1112.4980.pdfhttps://arxiv.org/pdf/1112.4980.pdf

Academic paper

Edits on 5 Jun, 2018
Golden AI"Corrections"
Golden AI edited on 5 Jun, 2018
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Further reading (+5/-5 characters)
Further reading

Author
Title
Link
Type

Meni Rosenfeld

Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining RewardSystems

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1112.4980.pdf

Academic Paperpaper

Edits on 1 Jun, 2018
Golden AI"Merging standard tables"
Golden AI edited on 1 Jun, 2018
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Academic papers (-1 rows) (-3 cells) (-96 characters)
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Academic papers

Author
Title
Link

Meni Rosenfeld

Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining RewardSystems

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1112.4980.pdf

Further reading

Author
Title
Link
Type

Meni Rosenfeld

Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining RewardSystems

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1112.4980.pdf

Academic Paper

Edits on 5 Apr, 2018
Joshua Holley"Added the abstract and did some small housekeeping for the sake of readability"
Joshua Holley edited on 5 Apr, 2018
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Block Withholding Attack

An attack in which a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks to the pool in an effort to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop.

Article

A Block Withholding attack is when a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks he finds to the pool.

A Block Withholding attack occurs when a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks he finds to the pool. The intent of the attack is to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop. This type of attack, if sustained for a long enough period, can bankrupt a pay-per-share pool. Mitigation of a Block Withholding attack is complex because of the random nature of mining, but some methods have been developed.

Mitigation of the block withholding attack is complex because of the random nature of mining, but some methods have been developed.

Edits on 24 Jan, 2018
Adam McKenna
Adam McKenna edited on 24 Jan, 2018
Edits made to:
Academic papers (+1 rows)
Academic papers

Author
Title
Link

Meni Rosenfeld

Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining RewardSystems

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1112.4980.pdf

Adam McKenna
Adam McKenna edited on 24 Jan, 2018
Edits made to:
Article (+146/-20 characters)
Article

A Block Withholding attack is when a miner or miners mines on a pool but intentionally does not submit any blocks he finds to the pool.

...

Mitigation of the block withholding attack is complex because of the random nature of mining, but some methods have been developed.

Adam McKenna
Adam McKenna edited on 24 Jan, 2018
Edits made to:
Article (+298 characters)
Article

A Block Withholding attack is when miner or miners mines on a pool but intentionally does not submit blocks to the pool.

...

The intent of the attack is to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop. This type of attack, if sustained for a long enough period, can bankrupt a pay-per-share pool.

Adam McKenna"Initial topic creation"
Adam McKenna created this topic on 24 Jan, 2018
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 Block Withholding Attack

An attack in which a miner on a pool intentionally does not submit any blocks to the pool in an effort to cause the profitability of the mining pool to drop.

Article

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